STUDENT VOICES:

What Students are Saying about Antisemitism on their Campuses


*See UC Student Testimonials from 2015 – present here

 

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Arizona State University:

 

  • Nov 2014 – Arizona State University Jewish Student (Randall) “It frightened me how blatantly anti-Semitic their display was, and yet how convincing it could be for the untrained eye, or to a student who does not know enough about the situation.” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Arizona State University Jewish Student (Randall) “It is terrifying because such activism targets a specific group on campus, the Jewish students at ASU.” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Arizona State University Jewish Student (Randall) “It frightens me how persistent SJP and its supporters are with these displays and with their advocacy of BDS (the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement against Israel) and how people remain quiet and subdued.” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Arizona State University Jewish Student (Randall) “Just the other day as I was walking to my Hebrew class, I saw on one of our lawns a display erected by Students For Justice in Palestine (SJP) that blatantly demonized Israel, accusing it of being an apartheid state and comparing Israeli policies to those of the Nazi party in the 1940s. Outraged, frustrated, and confused, I approached the SJP students and engaged them in a calm dialogue. I simply asked them what their stance was on Israel. These students responded forcefully by denouncing Israel’s right to exist and accusing Israel of murdering thousands of innocent Palestinians. I stood there baffled by their response, but I continued to speak to them peacefully. I simply wanted to understand their stance on Palestinian injustices. However, as the conversation deepened, they insisted on demonizing Israel and refusing to recognize Israel as a state.” Read more

 

Binghamton University:

 

  • September 2014 – Jewish Binghamton University Student (Joshua) “On Friday, Sept. 12, I attended the weekly Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) meeting…That night, I stayed as I long as I could, but after half an hour I had to leave to attend prayer services since the Jewish Sabbath begins Friday evening. As I quietly exited the room, I heard a snide voice: “Oh, was it something I said?” “No,” I answered, “The Sabbath is beginning and I need to leave for prayers.” At that moment, the entire room broke into laughter. Horrified and embarrassed, I left the room. When I heard a room full of my peers laugh in response to my religious convictions, I could not have been made to feel more embarrassed, uncomfortable and ashamed than I was at that moment.” Read more

 

Boston University:

 

  • May 3, 2016 – Boston University Jewish Student (Marlo) – “How can someone like this be on campus? It’s really scary. As a Jewish student, I’m very concerned.” Read more
  • January 27, 2016 – Boston University Jewish Student (Hannah) “I’m a member of the Students for Israel and [I’m] a Jew. When I got here, [I was] surprised to feel the animosity on campus.” Read more
  • November 19, 2015 – Boston University Jewish Student (Ariel) “I felt harassed and unsafe…At the meeting, I was personally harassed and victimized by members of this movement. One person sitting in the row in front of me had the audacity to take a picture of me and write the caption, “A product of white male privilege” before he posted it on his Snapchat Story. I heard others whispering, “That’s the Jew!” when certain BU SG senators spoke.” Read more
  • November 19, 2015 – Boston University Jewish Student (Ariel) “When I told them that it was anti-Semitic to say such, they responded by hideously asking, “So now everyone is an anti-Semite?” Read more

 

Brown University:

 

  • May 25, 2016 – Brown University Jewish Student (Ben) “[I’ve] felt targeted and unsafe for [my] pro-Israel views.” Read more
  • May 11, 2016 – Brown University Students for Israel Open Letter – “The campus atmosphere around Israel/Palestine is so repressive that most Zionist students do not feel able to voice their ideas openly, to stand up to biased professors, or even to discuss Israel in public spaces. Those of us who do choose to defend the single Jewish State are subject to harassment, name-calling, derision from students and teachers’ assistants, and even direct threats to our personal safety. Only in Hillel are we able to speak freely about our support for a two-state solution.” Read more
  • April 4, 2016 – Brown University Jewish Student (Benjamin) Events at Brown University recently raised questions of what equating anti-Zionism with anti-Semitism really means. Anti-Zionist students convinced a transgender human rights activist not to speak at an event because it was co-sponsored by a Jewish group, even though that group took no position on Israel/Palestine. Anti-Semitic and homophobic graffiti soon followed.” Read more
  • March 25, 2016 – Brown University Jewish Student (Ben) “Many people, mostly non-Jews, have told me that anti-Semitism is no longer real, which takes a lot of chutzpah and a lot of non-Jewish privilege. Members of Students for Justice in Palestine have tried to tell me what constitutes anti-Semitism and what does not, what I have a right to feel and what I do not. They have lectured me on when it is and is not appropriate to reference the suffering of my people in the Holocaust. Meanwhile, I am accused of murdering Jesus; I am told that I have too much power; I suffer from microaggressions that evoke the Holocaust regularly. What gives them the right to tell me whether or not Zionism is an acceptable way to access my Jewish heritage and peoplehood? What gives them the right to tell me what it means to be Jewish or what it means to face anti-Semitism?” Read more
  • March 19, 2016 – Brown University Jewish Student (Lauren) “Anti-Semitic and anti-Israel sentiment has been allowed to fester on our campus for years now. I’m disturbed, disgusted and disappointed that Brown community members would do this, but am, sadly, not surprised” Read more
  • February 1, 2016 -Brown University Jewish Student (Benjamin) “As a Jewish student in the audience, I couldn’t help but worry about the implications of a group on Brown’s campus accusing a non-Israeli Jew (who openly challenges Israeli policies) of carrying out a foreign government’s subversive plots. Is any Jew in the public eye, then, subject to allegations of fifth-column conspiracy?” Read more
  • February 1, 2016 -Brown University Jewish Student (Benjamin) “I was very disappointed to see that “Students for Justice in Palestine” had selected this event — one that was meant not as a political discussion but as a conversation about personal identities — as a target for protest.” Read more
  • October 2014 – Jewish Brown University Student (Zach) “Should I have to enter my dorm and look at a swastika on the door? Do we have such a short memory of 20th century events that we forget how traumatizing these symbols are for Jews, many of whom had family live through or perish in the Holocaust?” Read more
  • October 2014 – Jewish Brown University Student (Zach) “Should I have to enter my dorm and look at a swastika on the door? Do we have such a short memory of 20th century events that we forget how traumatizing these symbols are for Jews, many of whom had family live through or perish in the Holocaust?” Read more

 

Brooklyn College:

 

  • October 14, 2015 – Recently Graduated Brooklyn College Jewish Student (Melanie) ““I didn’t mind being a face for Israel on campus, but I was continually harassed..[I would] receive threatening Facebook messages, emails, texts and phone calls from SJP members with such messages as “watch your back” and “we know what you’re doing” and advising [me] not to go to certain places on campus.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Brooklyn College Graduate (Melanie) “If you were openly Jewish, it could work against you.” Read more
  • April 2015 – (Article Author) “Though [Melanie] never ran for office, she said it was commonplace for student body representatives to hide their Jewish identity in order to solicit votes.” Read more

 

Capital University:

 

  • March 30, 2016 – Capital University Jewish Student (Austin) “A student at one point had an Israeli flag in his window and students outside began shouting ‘Heil Hitler.’ Another Israeli flag was stolen several times from a student’s porch, and at one time pennies were left outside Jewish students’ doors to ‘perpetuate the stereotype of penny-pinching Jews’…There’s some lack of understanding on campus. It’s a very small minority, but it’s a troubling minority that we were hoping to address and let people know that this isn’t OK.” Read more

 

Claremont McKenna College:

 

  • February 26, 2016 – Claremont Colleges Consortium Jewish Students (Aiden, Orren, Stacey and Ben) – “On Dec. 13, 2015 – an email from Campus Safety detailing an anti-Semitic death threat at the Claremont Colleges left us disoriented. According to the email, a student was approached at a Harvey Mudd College holiday party and told, “I can tell you are Jewish because of your nose and your hair” before the suspect declared that he wanted to “fucking kill all of you people.” After receiving the notification, the four of us were unsure how to react and how to move forward. That day, we all spoke on the phone, attempting to locate the source of our confusion, pain, and silence. As we worked to process our own emotional reactions, we heard many students express that the administration had only reacted so swiftly to the incident because ‘Jews are white.’” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish Claremont McKenna College Student (Bryan) “[The two hate crime incidents against me] serve as a great example for how classic anti-Semitism is being cleanly repackaged as anti-Israeli sentiment and then perpetrated under that name. It’s still the same old hatred that caused the Holocaust; it’s still out and about today. But it operates under the name of something else today.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish Claremont McKenna College Student (Bryan) “[Campus Safety] did not seem to give the appropriate tone and severity to responding to a hate incident. In their report to Dean Spellman that I got to see, it was very obvious that they did not listen to anything I said. The way that they handled it was so unprofessional, that I didn’t go back.” Read more

 

Clark University:

 

  • February 4, 2016 – Clark University Jewish Student (Hannah) – “Usually, they [SJP] assume that since I’m black, that I can’t be Jewish. They usually ask me if I’m adopted, and if they know that Jews can be colors other than white, they ask me if I’m Ethiopian. Many black students have told me that they see me as less black, not because my mom is white, but because she and I are Jewish. I do not think that my peers think that anti-Semitism exists at a PWI [Predominantly white institution] that is 33 percent Jewish, but it’s actually really bad. Most people think that anti-Semitism doesn’t exist and is only a religion issue, not anything having to do with appearance. But, I can attest personally that this isn’t true.” Read more
  • December 18, 2015 – Clark University Jewish Student (Lilia) “As a Jewish student, I feel unsafe on my campus.” Read more
  • October 31, 2015 – Clark University Jewish Student (Seth) “The doodling of a Swastika on a wall is not simply a minute act, it is an attack on my very right to live as a Jew. It isn’t a joke, it is a declaration of war.” Read more

 

Cleveland State University:

 

  • April 2015 – Jewish Cleveland State University Student (TJ) “March 17, The Cauldron reported that swastikas were drawn on the walls in CSU’s Main Classroom, and I was at a loss for words. Until this recent event, I would have never pictured CSU as a place where something as appalling as Anti-Semitism would occur… Since receiving the email from the President’s Office and reading the article about the swastikas in The Cauldron, I expected to have heard at least a small update about the investigation or possible suspects.I haven’t heard any updates whatsoever. Why hasn’t the university updated the student body on their investigation of the crime?” Read more

 

College of Staten Island:

 

  • April 2015 – Jewish College of Staten Island Student (Stacey) “I’ve seen videos that have taken place in the center of our campus where there are anti-Semitic rallies promoting how Jewish people suffocate the Arabs in Israel, holding them hostage and not allowing them to leave Israel for labor or college.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Article Author Discussing Experience of a Jewish Student “..when he was walking to a night course. Some kids approached him and started taunting him, asking if he was going to blow up the building [alluding to Israel’s summer war in Gaza]. Although this was a simple comment,,,it had the power to evoke a lot of fear” Read more

 

Columbia University/Barnard College:

 

  • March 3, 2016 – Columbia University Jewish Student (Jackie) – “By endorsing BDS without acknowledging that many pro-Israel adherents feel that it actively seeks to “demonize Israel and attack pro-Israel students,” the mock apartheid wall perpetuates the notion that Israel does not have the right to exist—a modern and, perhaps trendy, version of anti-Semitism disguised as social justice.” Read more
  • February 22, 2016 – Columbia University Jewish Student (Amalia) – ““When “long live the Intifada” was posted on Facebook by the Barnard Columbia Socialists—a group officially recognized by the University—I felt exposed and unprotected. “Intifada,” or “armed uprising,” has historically referred to an ongoing period of violence against Israeli civilians. For me, the word “Intifada” stirs up memories that I want to leave behind—memories of bombings from my childhood during the Second Intifada and of shootings and stabbings from two months ago when I last visited home. These were memories I thought I had done away with by coming to Columbia” Read more
  • February 22, 2016 – Columbia University Jewish Student (Amalia) – “To call for Intifada is to bring the reality from which we all left here to Columbia. To call for Intifada is to make me and so many others walk around this campus feeling like we are back to living in fear. Moreover, to allow the call for Intifada go unanswered is to legitimize the very violence for which it calls. And to call for violence is only one step away from actually conducting it.” Read more
  • February 10, 2016 – Columbia University Jewish Student (Marissa) – “…the divestment campaign’s push for intersectionality leaves many Jewish students feeling marginalized. It’s an extremely divisive campaign.” Read more
  • February 3, 2016 – Columbia University Jewish Student (Alexandra) – “The professors who support us have said they can’t come out publicly on our side, because they’re afraid it would jeopardize their careers.” Read more
  • March 2015 – Jewish Barnard College Student (Daniella) “The flyer campaign, entitled “Speak The Truth,” was intended to combat Israel Apartheid Week, an annual campaign criticizing Israel and promoting Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS), which began Monday on college campuses across the U.S. “We’ve had our flyers vandalized and removed; it’s been more vicious and disrespectful than we’re used to,” said Daniella…a sophomore at Barnard and a board member of Aryeh (formerly LionPAC), the largest Israel advocacy group on campus.” Read more

 

Connecticut College:

 

  • May 11, 2016 – Connecticut College Jewish Student (Conner) – “My original reaction was shock…my initial reaction was that I was ostracized and singled out for something I associate so personally with and defend each day – Israel.” Read more

 

Cornell University:

 

  • November 19, 2015 – Cornell University Jewish Student (Evan) “In the past couple of years, we can clearly see SJP’s anti-Israel rhetoric evolve into anti-Semitism. SJP has a notorious record of violence on college campuses and poisoning relationships with Jews.” Read more

 

CSU Long Beach:

 

  • October 14, 2015 – JEWISH CSULB STUDENT & 49ERS FOR ISRAEL MEMBER (Kelsey) “We’re for peace and for co-existence, but on campuses we’re seeing anti-Semitism pop up,” said Kelsey Kimmes of 49ers for Israel, a student organization. “It’s hate speech. If educated students on campus only see one side, that’s what they’re going to believe.” Read more

 

CUNY System:

 

  • November 23, 2015 – CUNY Hunter College Student (Name Unknown/Twitter) “Full-blown anti-Semitism allowed at my college. . . . I witnessed this and froze in fear.” Read more
  • November 17, 2015 – CUNY System Student (Zeke) “I’m a CUNY student. SJP continuously decides to not treat students of differing views with respect or dignity. They create an environment of fear and bullying to further their political agenda.” Read more
  • November 17, 2015 – CUNY System Student (A.T.) “I am a CUNY student and what the SJP group is doing and stands for is disgusting, especially the ways they attempt to cause mayhem. They restort to rudeness, disrespect, racial slurs, and violence. The SJP’s need to be stopped.” Read more
  • November 17, 2015 – CUNY System Student (Maor) “I too was harassed with hate speech at this protest that was supposed to be against tuition hike that somehow turned into antisemitic and anti Zionist protest.” Read more
  • November 16, 2015 – CUNY Hunter College Jewish Student (Yosef) “As I left the rally, someone yelled, “We should drag the Zionists down the street!” It took a few seconds to register that I was a Zionist walking down the street. A CUNY public safety officer protected me from being attacked.” Read more
  • November 16, 2015 – CUNY Hunter College Jewish Student (Yosef) “I along with three other pro-Israel, Jewish Hunter students became the target of verbal abuse. Protestors screamed at us that we did not belong in CUNY. Some even threatened us with physical harm.” Read more

 

Dartmouth University:

 

  • May 6, 2016 – University of Dartmouth College Jewish Student (Matthew) “I believe that in GRID’s sponsoring of Puar’s speech, they were sponsoring anti-Semitic rhetoric, because it kept fully in line with what she has said before.” Read more

 

DePaul University:

 

  • March 2015 – Jewish DePaul Student (Sarah) – “I felt like I was being undervalued and attacked on my own campus,” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish DePaul Student (Caleb) – “When people say that Israel does not have a right to exist and does not have the right to protect its citizens, that makes me feel incredibly uncomfortable on this campus as a Jew and as a supporter of Israel. I think the message is more anti-Semitic than anti-Zionist.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Jewish DePaul Student (Rachel) – “About two months ago when SJP (Students for Justice in Palestine) started the ‘DePaul Divest’ campaign, I no longer felt safe on this campus and I no longer felt I could be a proud Jewish student.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Jewish DePaul Student (Rachel) – “This entire campaign and entire sit-in going on in the SAC (Schmitt Academic Center) is totally unsafe for Jewish students and I have had a lot of Jewish students text me and call me today and tell me they are not comfortable walking through that part of our campus, which is really disheartening” Read more
  • May 2014 – Jewish DePaul Student (Ally) – “I do…feel as a Jewish student that I am being targeted on campus. I feel that… I am constantly on the defensive on campus. I have to defend myself, my Judaism, my pride in Israel every day and it’s getting…exhausting.” Read more

 

Duke University:

 

  • February 23, 2016 – Duke Student (Davis) – “I was shocked when a Jewish student challenged the protestors [comparing the U.S. prison system with the Holocaust] on this point and was met with, in a horribly mocking tone, “Oh, are you offended?” Read more
  • February 4, 2016 – Duke University Student (Tyler) – “When someone wrote “No n*****s, whites only” on a Black Lives Matter flyer, the Duke community held a march where over a hundred students marched and rallied in support. They did the same thing when someone wrote a homophobic slur in the dorms. When someone wrote anti-Semitic comments on a Duke Friends of Israel flyer, there was no march, rally, or campus outrage.” Read more

 

Elon University:

 

  • April 21, 2016 – Elon University Jewish Student (Carly) “[I had] hopes to study abroad in Israel, but was advised against it by several professors. [I took a] History class with a focus on the Middle East and how Israel came to be in which the professor said the existence of Israel was made possible because ‘Jews had Jews back home to send them more money and the poor Arabs didn’t have any rich Arabs to fund them.’” Read more
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Emory University:

 

  • October 2014 – Jewish Emory University Student (Noah) “However naive it may seem, I did not think I would be the target of anti-Semitism while attending a college with a substantial Jewish population. However, times have changed, and we’re faced with a new and difficult reality here on campus.” Read more
  • October 2014 – Jewish Emory University Student (Noah) “The swastikas represented a clear message: Jews are not welcome on this campus.” Read more

 

Florida Atlantic University:

 

  • June 17, 2016 – Florida Atlantic University Jewish Student (Nadav) “It was scary. SJP activists hung the signs on our dorm doors and on the Sabbath elevator during the exam period. It stressed everyone out and affected our ability to concentrate on our studies, which seems to have been their goal.” Read more
  • September 2012 – Florida Atlantic University Jewish Student (Rayna) – “SJP distributed a mock eviction notice on my door in the dormitory. I was known to SJP as an advocate for Israel, so it was not a coincidence that my door was included in their activities…[I] could not find any other eviction notices posted on doors on her floor.” Read more

Florida State University:

 

  • November 2014 – Jewish Florida State University Student (Tatiana) “Last week, among other things, I was told by a Palestinian student visiting FSU that the 67 innocent Jews murdered in Hebron in 1929 were actually not Jews, but Arabs. I was also told I am less of a person than Hitler because at least Hitler had the chutzpah to declare his genocide on the Jewish people and that I am masquerading as though I want peace. I was told I am a racist, and a Nazi, and an imperialist who needs to check my white privilege. I was told that Israel is not a state but an occupying force directly responsible for the plight of the Palestinian people. I was told that the Palestinians are not interested in peace and coexistence, but that they will take back the land that is rightfully theirs. I was told that Hamas and Fatah are in no way responsible for what is happening to the people in the Palestinian Authority and Gaza. I read a sign “Israel=terrorist.” And I think for the first time in my adult life, I truly understood what it means to stare racism straight in the face.” Read more

George Mason University:

 

  • March 4 2015 – Jewish George Mason University Student (Ariella) “I never said anything bad about Palestinians. And people tell me I hate, I want to kill Palestinian babies because I merely said that there are two sides to every story. Even being moderate gets you attacked. And I’ve been called names by certain people for standing up for Israel but also they would attack my Judaism like I’m a brainwashed Zionist or like I’m just a brainwashed silly Jewish American Princess, which is ridiculous. So I have been called names by certain individuals at this school but the school itself is not perpetrating these incidents” Read more

 

George Washington University:

 

  • March 2015 – Jewish George Washington University Student (Rachel) Following three swastikas drawn on residence halls, the University is criticized for it’s response to Jewish concerns. According to the GW Hatchet, “Rachel Schwartzman, a resident in the hall, said the University was “not treating the students as adults” or responding to their concerns quickly. Schwartzman, who is a member of the historically Jewish sorority Alpha Epsilon Phi, which has members housed on a floor in the building, said officials did not formally acknowledge the vandalism until a meeting with residents on Wednesday – four days after the initial report. That, she said, made her and other residents feel like the incident was being “swept under the rug.” Students had to ask their parents to call the University Police Department because reports about the anti-Semitic symbols were not initially taken seriously, she said.” Read more

 

Grand Valley State University:

 

  • April 20, 2016 – Grand Valley State University Jewish Student (declined to be identified for fear of retaliation) “It made me feel uncomfortable, because a swastika is a representation of the genocide of an entire race. It’s obviously a big problem.” Read more
  • April 20, 2016 – Grand Valley State University Jewish Student (Zoe) “It makes me feel uncomfortable to be in classes, as a student. It doesn’t make me have pride in my school. It’s so upsetting, and nobody really understands. My non-Jewish friends won’t understand that I’m a target, and these people who are targeting me don’t even know me.” Read more

 

Harvard University:

 

  • May 4, 2016 – Harvard University Jewish Student (Unnamed in article) “This incident of anti-Semitism didn’t occur in a vacuum…Harvard has become a fertile environment for anti-Israel activism through its constant hosting of speakers and events, and support for student clubs and programs, whose major purpose is the demonization of the Jewish state.” Read more
  • April 18, 2016 – Harvard Law School Jewish Students (Jeremy , Jacqueline  and Jonathan) “Anti-Semitism is still very real today, and it just showed itself in our community at Harvard Law School. At the Q&A section of an event last Thursday, an HLS student asked Jewish, Israeli dignitary Tzipi Livni: “How is it that you are so smelly? . . . A question about the odor of Ms. Tzipi Livni, she’s very smelly, and I was just wondering.”… Discussions about Israel cannot devolve into ad hominem attacks against Jews…The Nazis promoted the idea that Jews “smell” to propagandize Jews as an inferior people. The idea that Jews can be identified by a malodor is patently offensive and stereotypes Jews as an “other” which incites further acts of discrimination. The fact that such a hate-filled and outdated stereotype reemerged at Harvard Law School is nothing short of revolting.” Read more

 

Harvey Mudd College:

 

  • February 26, 2016 – Claremont Colleges Consortium Jewish Students (Aiden, Orren, Stacey and Ben) – “On Dec. 13, 2015 – an email from Campus Safety detailing an anti-Semitic death threat at the Claremont Colleges left us disoriented. According to the email, a student was approached at a Harvey Mudd College holiday party and told, “I can tell you are Jewish because of your nose and your hair” before the suspect declared that he wanted to “fucking kill all of you people.” After receiving the notification, the four of us were unsure how to react and how to move forward. That day, we all spoke on the phone, attempting to locate the source of our confusion, pain, and silence. As we worked to process our own emotional reactions, we heard many students express that the administration had only reacted so swiftly to the incident because ‘Jews are white.’” Read more

 

Kean University:

 

  • October 2014 – Jewish Kean University Student (Nataniel) “I don’t want to wear my Jewish star on campus…I don’t want to wear anything that has Israel on it or any connection to Judaism at all. I don’t want to have a target on my back.” Read more
  • October 2014 – Jewish Kean University Student (Nataniel)“I definitely feel threatened by it [swastikas by his dorm room door]” Read more

 

Kent State University:

 

  • Kent State University Jewish Student (Sophia) “I’m fearful for campus, especially the pro-Israel community.” Read more

 

Loyola University Chicago:

 

  • March 2015 – Loyola University Chicago Jewish Student (Brendon) “’It’s upsetting’ when other students tell Jewish students that the resolution isn’t anti-Semitic” Read more
  • March 2015 – Author of Article in Loyola Phoenix “After the Senate debate began, fear of possible violent repercussions for the bill came up often. Some of this opposition referred to one woman’s public comment that gave an account of receiving bomb threats and rape threats after opposing the divestment resolution last year. The Senate voted to make votes on the resolution anonymous.” Read more
  • March 2015 – Jewish Student and VP of Hillel Chapter of Loyola University Chicago (Adam) “It’s making us politicized as Jewish students … Because of this resolution, within the last two weeks, we have seen students sit inside Hillel and ask for interviews. Students are refusing to come into the space … Student government is supposed to ensure safety and welfare for students.”” Read more
  • March 2015 – Loyola University Chicago Jewish Student (Nicole) “No one gets to tell me that my passion for Israel is wrong. It is so limiting to be pro-Israel on campus. Will I be welcome on campus if I am vocal about supporting Israel? I’m concerned.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Hillel Chapter President of Loyola University Chicago (Talia) “Members of SJP started monitoring the table, walking by, pointing and talking about it like they were clearly planning something.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Hillel Chapter President of Loyola University Chicago (Talia) “As the tabling event concluded, pro-Palestinian students began to pepper Hillel members with hostile questions such as “How does it feel to be an occupier?” and “How does it feel to be guilty of ethnic cleansing?” One member is worried about attending future Hillel events for fear of being attacked.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Hillel Chapter President of Loyola University Chicago (Talia) “Hillel students are anxious for results [from the university investigation], and want to feel protected on this campus. Campus security must attend every single event we hold because of the campus climate towards Jews.” Read more

 

Goucher University:

 

  • November 11, 2015 – Goucher College Jewish Israeli Speaker Recounting Students Remarks Following Disruption of a Jewish Event (Assi) “I could see the fear on the faces of the Jewish students that were sitting in the hall…Students reflected afterward that they were simply afraid to speak as they would likely be targeted and possibly assaulted the next day.” Read more

  • November 6, 2015 – Goucher College Jewish Student (Natalie) “As a queer person, I don’t feel welcome at TALQ BIG. The group has made a radical anti-Israel position a prerequisite for being a proud queer person on this campus. All who agree are welcome. Queer people who don’t fit into that box are not. It is a supposedly inclusionary tactic with disturbingly exclusionary results.”Read more

  • November 5, 2015 – Jewish Goucher College Student (Max) “On this night however, I no longer feel comfortable being a Goucher student. I have become a target…No one on Goucher’s campus should ever feel bullied into silence. This is what happened tonight. We were attacked and we were bullied.” Read more

 

Manhattanville College:

 

  • October 21, 2015 – Jewish Manhattanville Student (Evelyn) “the “disrespect and ignorance” [I have] faced as a Jewish student is hard to believe. [In one particularly offensive incident, Obertnaya described how she was working a table for Hillel at a club fair when a student, upon hearing that the group was Jewish, threw a penny on the ground to see if she would “go pick it up.”]” Read more
  • October 21, 2015 – Jewish Manhattanville Student (Jen) “…one class…the professor used “Israel” and “apartheid” interchangeably. I stood up and said, ‘that’s not right, and I find your wording offensive.’” Read more

 

Marquette University:

 

  • April 2015 – Marquette University Student (Jnana) – “This [divestment] campaign has made Israel and students who support Israel as ‘the other,’ through intimidation, mistruth and alienation” Read More

 

Michigan State University:

 

  • February 11, 2016 – Michigan State University Jewish Student (Brad) – “I was with my friends leaving a lecture hall and they found out I had driven to class. So they began asking me for a ride back to their homes and I said I couldn’t do it because I had other things to do. One of the kids got visibly upset by this and stormed off and, as he was walking away, muttered under his breath that, ‘he’ll save a spot on the train to Auschwitz’ for me.’” Read more
  • February 11, 2016 – Michigan State University Jewish Student (Jesse) – NOTE: describing an incident when the Jewish fraternity house (AEPi) was broken into and their composite — the collection of portraits showing current members of the fraternity — was vandalized with drawn-on Hitler mustaches and swastikas. – “It was just kind of the shock that it happened to me, to us as a chapter. When it actually set in that we were the target of anti-Semitism, that was the hardest part to accept.” Read more

 

New York University (NYU):

 

  • March 28, 2016 – NYU Jewish Graduate Student (Samuel) – “One of my many concerns about BDS is not simply that is demonizes Israel as an ‘apartheid’ and ‘colonial’ state, but that its activists use this rhetoric in such ambiguous and normalizing ways” Read more
  • April 2014 Jewish NYU student and resident of Palladium and Steinhardt Sophomore (Anonymous) – “Being very straightforward, this made me feel targeted and unsafe in my own dorm room and I know others feel exactly the same as myself. I understand free speech rights but if this was targeted solely to Jewish students then this appears to be of a more threatening nature rather than informative.” Read More
  • April 2014 Jewish NYU student (Laura) – “I woke up this morning to frantic text messages and pictures of the flyers from many of my Jewish friends who live in Palladium, the dorm where these flyers were distributed. They expressed that waking up to these flyers, slipped under their doors in the dark of night, made them feel violated and unsafe. Slipping these flyers under students’ dorm room doors, in flagrant violation of NYU housing policy, creates a hostile environment for Jewish students.” Read More
  • September 2014 – Jewish NYU Student Alumni (Steven) “As co-president of the Israel club at the NYU Hillel, I tried unsuccessfully to engage our critics. I attended meetings held by the Students for Justice in Palestine, joined Facebook groups, and attended anti-Israel events. My repeated overtures to pro-Palestinian groups on campus fell on deaf ears.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish NYU Student Alumni (Steven) “Much like the Israeli-Palestinian conflict itself, dialogue between pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian advocates often fails because the two groups seek to yell at, rather than talk to, each other. However, even when we do listen to one another, there is a gulf which is more conceptual than linguistic. Israel advocates speak of Peace; Palestinian advocates of Justice…Most Israelis and Palestinians seek to live in peace, despite political differences. I hope that advocates abroad, rather than demanding vague notions of justice, can help us to build bridges and to promote peace.” Read more

 

Northeastern University:

 

  • April 2015 – Article Author “Students are even experiencing anti-Semitism in the classroom. At Northeastern University, professor, Muhammad Shahid Alam, demonizes Israel, delegitimizes Jewish history and infringes on his student’s free speech by shutting down any differing views. A non-Jewish student that dropped his class stated that “if someone does raise a counterpoint, he uses semantics to twist it around and try to tear whoever asked the question apart.” Classrooms are a place where students should feel comfortable sharing their unique opinions. Some of the most meaningful learning experiences occur when students question course content and explore various perspectives. Therefore, violating a student’s right to free speech is also infringing on their right to learn.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Unnamed Jewish Northeastern Student Alumni “I had never in my life, ever, experienced anti-semitism first hand until this past year when I witnessed Professor Alam and Professor Sullivan display an age old hatred against the Jewish people. . . . I now unfortunately can understand what bigotry really is, and it is absolutely not something that I ever wanted or needed to experience. No one should have to experience hatred like this in their learning environment.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Unnamed Jewish Northeastern Student “[I]f they find out I’m Jewish, they’ll target me.” Read more
  • October 2013, Jewish Northeastern Students “The Jewish community at Northeastern is beginning to feel unsafe and uncomfortable on campus…” Read more

 

Northwestern University:

 

  • March 8, 2016 – Northwestern Jewish Student (Tomer) – “I left the building feeling helpless. It is not the first time I have received hatred for being a Zionist, for being Jewish. I have been beaten up, verbally bullied and made to feel that my identity was something to be embarrassed of.” Read more
  • February 11, 2016 – Northwestern University Jewish Student (Ross) – “There is a “consistent pattern” of hateful messaging that comes from SJP chapters across the country.” Read more
  • October 15, 2015 – Northwestern Jewish Student (Inbal) “I know a lot of Israelis and Jews on campus feel so very uncomfortable with this event because they feel personally attacked.” Read more
  • Feb 24, 2015 – Jewish Northwestern Student (Julia) “I am terrified knowing I may not be able to discuss my Judaism without taunts, or worse, violence.” Read more
  • Feb 24, 2015 – Jewish Northwestern Student (Julia) “ I am told when I try to talk about anti-Semitism in the West to “check my privilege,” or that we are part of the machine fueling inequality.” Read more
  • January 29, 2014 – Jewish Northwestern Student (Max) “I’m most unwilling to excuse how the SJP speakers occasionally used “Jew” and “Israeli” interchangeably, and “Palestinian” and “Arab” interchangeably. Distraught at the anti-Semitism conveyed through the images of what the speakers described as “Jewish-only roads,” I sent in a question on an index card during the Q-and-A session about this, which the speakers read aloud. Fully aware of the answer, I asked “Is it possible to be Palestinian, but not Arab, or Arab but not Palestinian?” And my question was answered correctly – yes it is possible. The speakers even listed a couple different ethnic and religious combinations that exist such as Palestinian-Jew, Palestinian-Muslim and Arab-Jew. However, they left out one incredibly important ethnic group, one that, without suitable context, punctures a hole through SJP’s narrative: Israeli-Arabs. Because SJP’s lecturers used “Israeli” and “Jew” synonymously, they painted the picture that certain roads in Israel can only be accessed by Jewish people, and that non-Jews were forced to use decrepit, unpaved motorways. The truth is that Israeli Arabs living in the West Bank are 100 percent allowed to use these “Jewish-only roads” despite the fact that none of them practice Judaism. A more accurate description with appropriate context would have been “Non-Palestinian” roads, which became necessary after the sheer number of suicide bomber attacks in Jerusalem during the Second Intifada.” Read more

Oberlin College:

 

  • March 8, 2016 – Jewish Student (Unnamed) – “As a supporter of Israel, I no longer feel safe on this campus.” Read more
  • March 5, 2016 – Oberlin College Jewish Student (Sarah**pseudonym) – “[myh] issue with the response to anti-Semitism is that others feel as though they’re allowed to say what is and isn’t anti-Semitic. This isn’t right, and it should only be expressed by Jewish students.”
  • March 5, 2016 – Oberlin College Jewish Student (Jenny**pseudonym) – “[…it’s especially frustrating when fellow students dismiss [me] when [I] claim something is anti-Semitic.] People always say, ‘I’m being anti-Zionist, not anti-Semitic. I have Jewish friends.” Read more
  • August 27, 2014 – Former Oberlin College Jewish Student (Anya F.H.) – “I was eager to join the Oberlin student body, which has a reputed passion for politics and social justice. It was exciting to meet so many people interested in social change and activism. After a few days on campus and many meetings, I began to see that words like “justice” and “oppression” were being used to bunch causes together into a jumble that a friend once called “the liberal checklist.” My fellow Obies and I were expected by our peers to join them in denouncing a plethora of social evils, including capitalism, racism, fracking, transphobia — and Israel. Student activists used strong words and bright visuals to paint the Israeli government and people as oppressive, Eurocentric and illegitimate. When some Jewish students brought up Jewish self-determination, Jews involved in Students for a Free Palestine declared that because they, too, were Jewish, it was wrong to disagree with them in the name of Judaism. One speaker drew laughs when she said that “Zionists should be burned at the stake.”…The toxic climate at Oberlin around Israel was one of the reasons why I transferred to the University of Pennsylvania this year.” Read more

 

Ohio University:

 

  • September 8, 2015 – Jewish Ohio University Student (Becky) “Parents came up to me last Rosh Hashanah saying they weren’t going to send their children to OU because of what happened to me and the other three students” Read more
  • March 5, 2015 – An Attorney for Ohio University Jewish Students Arrested for Peaceful Protest (Zuckerman) “I wish all the facts could come out at trial. I wish people could have seen the discriminatory way they were treated by the university and the student body.” Read more
  • March 5, 2015 – An Attorney for Ohio University Jewish Students Arrested for Peaceful Protest (Bossin) – “This whole case was driven by the university and the university police department. I think they were wrong in pursuing it the way they did and in the way they handled the whole case. It was driven by their desires, not by the City of Athens or the prosecutor’s office.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Ohio University Student (Becky) “Many Jewish students are feeling concerned about their safety and how other students will respond to these accusations against Israel.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Ohio University Student and Former Student Senate Treasurer (Carter Phillips) Referring to the arrest of pro-Israel speakers at a Senate meeting, Phillips said of the Senate in his resignation speech: “We disrupt them when they’re speaking, we chant when they sit down, and we have them arrested for speaking out. All legitimacy we had … went out the door in handcuffs last Wednesday. This is no longer a government, it is a circus.” Read more

 

Pitzer College:

 

  • February 26, 2016 – Claremont Colleges Consortium Jewish Students (Aiden, Orren, Stacey and Ben) – “On Dec. 13, 2015 – an email from Campus Safety detailing an anti-Semitic death threat at the Claremont Colleges left us disoriented. According to the email, a student was approached at a Harvey Mudd College holiday party and told, “I can tell you are Jewish because of your nose and your hair” before the suspect declared that he wanted to “fucking kill all of you people.” After receiving the notification, the four of us were unsure how to react and how to move forward. That day, we all spoke on the phone, attempting to locate the source of our confusion, pain, and silence. As we worked to process our own emotional reactions, we heard many students express that the administration had only reacted so swiftly to the incident because ‘Jews are white.’” Read more

 

Pomona College:

 

  • February 26, 2016 – Claremont Colleges Consortium Jewish Students (Aiden, Orren, Stacey and Ben) – “On Dec. 13, 2015 – an email from Campus Safety detailing an anti-Semitic death threat at the Claremont Colleges left us disoriented. According to the email, a student was approached at a Harvey Mudd College holiday party and told, “I can tell you are Jewish because of your nose and your hair” before the suspect declared that he wanted to “fucking kill all of you people.” After receiving the notification, the four of us were unsure how to react and how to move forward. That day, we all spoke on the phone, attempting to locate the source of our confusion, pain, and silence. As we worked to process our own emotional reactions, we heard many students express that the administration had only reacted so swiftly to the incident because ‘Jews are white.’” Read more

 

Portland State University:

 

  • June 1, 2016 – Portland State University Jewish Student (Shir) – “[At the May 23 divestment meeting] there was a lot of hate. They clearly didn’t want to hear the other side. They came with signs with very antisemitic remarks that read ‘Only one state, a Palestinian State.’ They even said that terrorist attacks are understandable because it’s a form of resistance. I have been told by Jewish students at PSU that they have been exposed to antisemitism activity in the university, and that it’s nothing new.” Read more
  • February 4, 2016 – Portland State University Pro-Israel Student (Brennan) – “And, while they pursue these progressive causes, they also say that Israel doesn’t have a right to exist and Jews don’t deserve a state, even though they admitted they had no problem with any of the other modern nation states that have a particular ethnic identity. It’s frustrating because it’s a cultural trend in the student body that I feel like we can’t stop.” Read more

 

Princeton University:

 

  • April 8, 2016 – Princeton University Student (Marni) “These anti-Semitic attacks might alienate Jewish students (and in turn, encourage them to withhold their voices), just as racist commentary can silence students of color.” Read more

 

Rutgers University:

 

  • October 22, 2015 – Jewish Rutgers University Student (Evan) “The result is that openly anti-Semitic rhetoric is tossed around casually” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish Rutgers University Student (Talia) “When I tell them [the professors referring to Israel as Palestine] that it is the sovereign state of Israel, not Palestine, they say, ‘Right — Israel, formerly known as Palestine.’” Read more
  • September 2014 – Rabbi of Rutgers Chabad (Baruch) “Palestinian activism has had an effect on students who face ‘everyday intimidation from students on campus, from professors on campus.’’” Read more
  • July 2011, Unnamed Jewish Rutgers University Student “[I] couldn’t leave [my] house and [I]was so riddled with anxiety that [I] couldn’t sleep.” Read more

San Diego State University (SDSU):

 

  • December 20, 2015 – SDSU Jewish Student (Chantal) “Throughout the second day of the conference, I was getting messages from students who were walking on campus with a Star of David necklace – a clear symbol of Jewish faith – stating that they were subjected to comments and snarls whenever they walked by SJP leaders attending the conference. On Saturday night, one of my SSI members had reported to me that SJP was marching in the street with Palestinian flags chanting anti-Israel slurs. It made her so uncomfortable that she no longer felt safe on her university campus. On Sunday, the beach cleanup brought together many different groups on campus to share a positive experience together and create light in the darkness of a war against anti-Semitism. A handful of beach cleanup attendees had worn t-shirts that showed their support with Israel and walked home after the event was over. On their way back, three members were harassed on separate accounts by SJP members yelling, “F*** Israel!” and following them for at least 20 feet while chanting anti-Israel slurs. In addition to that, on that Thursday afternoon, my home was egged. This was a strange coincidence considering the conference was just days earlier and Palestinian Day of Action was on October 13th, the day before this occurred.” Read more
  • Apr 2015 – Jewish SDSU Student (Ben) “I’d never think this would happen here, that’s one of the main reasons why I chose this school over other schools — especially UC’s — because I did not hear anything about any anti-Semitism. Obviously I see it now, and when prospective Jewish students ask me about SDSU, I feel obligated to let them know about the anti-Semitism on campus right now.” Read more
  • Apr 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) “The mere existence of this sentiment, with no condemnation from the administration, is troubling, not just for current students, but future generations who want to call SDSU their home” Read more
  • Apr 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) “It comes as no coincidence that the anti-Semitic graffiti at UCD came days after the controversial divestment movement passed the school senate. It also comes as no coincidence that the anti-Semitic posts on Yik Yak came during the divestment movement at SDSU. The BDS movement and new political anti-Semitism often go hand in hand, and to insist that this correlation is non-existent, despite resounding evidence, is socially irresponsible” Read more
  • Apr 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) “This “new political anti-Semitism” is a brand that has been perpetuated by the controversial Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement, which seeks to pull funds from companies invested in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. What makes this new political anti-Semitism unique is that it toes the difficult line between criticism of Israel’s domestic policy and disproportionate demonization of Israel and its inhabitants.” Read more
  • Apr 2015 – Jewish SDSU Student (Michael) “As a Jewish student on this campus, and the grandson of Holocaust survivors, I was disgusted and horrified by the anti-Semitic comments on Yik Yak,” Kagan said. “It was shocking to see how even on an anonymous forum, students were comfortable to spread such hatred and even went as far as praising Hitler” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Students Supporting Israel President (Sarah) “My biggest fear is that the campus climate will be even worse than it is. Right now, groups on campus aren’t really communicating with each other about this issue, and by having this hateful resolution on campus, it’s only going to create that barrier. Ultimately, it will divide us.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Students Supporting Israel President (Sarah) “By delegitimizing Israel, it means to destroy the Jewish state, Israel, and that is, to some level, anti-Semitic and we’ve seen across college campuses how divestment has lead to anti-Semitism.” Read more
  • Dec 2014 – Former SJP Member (Anthony) “I published the article, stating my change in stance regarding Divestment and condemned the organization [Students for Justice in Palestine] for being hateful. I condemned them for reducing Israel to a caricature specific to their narrative. I condemned them for marginalizing students on our campus. In just 2 days after publishing, I received over 30 messages, calling for my resignation from the paper, calling me a baby killer, a racist apartheid supporter, and other hateful slurs I can’t mention right now. I have been threatened on campus and off, online and offline and have lost friendships I valued in the process…I’ve lost my sense of safety on our campus” Read more
  • October 2014 – SDSU Jewish & Israeli Student (Sheli)“I didn’t feel welcome or comfortable, as a Jewish and Israeli student. The tension between SJP and Jewish students is always there … It isn’t a good place to start dialogues.” Read more
  • July 2014 – SDSU Jewish Student (Sydney)“SJP make me feel uncomfortable. As a student on the SDSU campus, the hostile way SJP promotes its position targets who I am as a person. SJP looks to point out the Jewish community on campus and targets Jewish students, saying that their homeland is illegitimate. As a person who has recently found their spirituality, Israel is more than a country. It is a place that I can call home even if I am thousands of miles away.” Read more
  • July 2014 – SDSU Student and President of Students in Support of Israel (Sarah), on trying to invite SJP to events“We, as an organization, truly care about Palestinians and their suffering. We have tried to hold events to raise money for Palestinian children and they turned us down on our offer to work with them. It’s just sad that two groups of students who care about a cause can’t work together. We try to tell SJP and their supporters that there is such a thing as being both pro-Palestine and pro-Israel” Read more
  • July 2014 – SDSU Former President of Students in Support of Israel (Nirit), claims she also pushed for dialogue with SJP“[I] was told SJP officers do not socialize with sympathizers of a brutal apartheid state.” Read more
  • July 2014 – SDSU student and article author (Anthony)“[SJP] further pushes toward a divided campus by instilling an attitude of ‘If you’re not with us, you’re against us,’ and painting this conflict as entirely black or white: either pro-Palestine or pro-Israel, with no middle ground. SJP has been adamant about spreading its message of justice for the Palestinians, and in the process has purposely demonized Israel and its citizens…” Read more
  • July 2014 – SDSU student and article author (Anthony) – “This kind of one-way communication is not a pathway toward dialogue or resolution, but rather supports a violent misrepresentation of Israel convenient to the specific narrative of SJP. It diminishes Israel and its people to one-dimensional caricatures, an act that is deeply offensive and incites anti-Semitic sentiments.” Read more

San Francisco State University (SFSU):

 

  • April 8, 2016 – SFSU Attendee at a Jewish Event on campus (Aaron) “…But, in a decision that should deeply disturb all who value a civil society, and one that I as a Jew find profoundly demoralizing, the police were instructed not to remove the disruptors and instead to stand by and watch the event be completely shut down. Please let that sink in. Public university administrators and police stood and watched as the Mayor of Jerusalem, the Jewish student organization that sponsored him, and all of us in attendance, were permanently bullied off the stage. …it would seem the spectacle was intended to send a message to campus Jews. Don’t invite Israeli dignitaries. They aren’t welcome. We won’t protect you, and we will humiliate you, your guests, and the Jewish community if you do. If this was the intended message, it was received.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Hillel at SFSU Recounts Jewish Students in Tears – “A large group of pro-Palestinians entered the campus quad and held a counter-rally [to the Jewish students’ Israel Independence Day event]. They were extremely vocal and their chants extreme…it became very tense. [M]any [recanted] afterward…how intimidating it had been. A few [Jewish] students left in tears.” Read more

 

 

Scripps College:

 

  • February 26, 2016 – Claremont Colleges Consortium Jewish Students (Aiden, Orren, Stacey and Ben) – “On Dec. 13, 2015 – an email from Campus Safety detailing an anti-Semitic death threat at the Claremont Colleges left us disoriented. According to the email, a student was approached at a Harvey Mudd College holiday party and told, “I can tell you are Jewish because of your nose and your hair” before the suspect declared that he wanted to “fucking kill all of you people.” After receiving the notification, the four of us were unsure how to react and how to move forward. That day, we all spoke on the phone, attempting to locate the source of our confusion, pain, and silence. As we worked to process our own emotional reactions, we heard many students express that the administration had only reacted so swiftly to the incident because ‘Jews are white.’” Read more
  • September 2015 – Jewish Scripps Student (Deena) – On college campuses today, although students have every right to disagree with some of the politics of the country, the events with they organize are not against the policies, they are against the people. They claim hatred against the Jews of Israel, and therefore the Jewish people of the world.” Read more

 

Sarah Lawrence College:

 

  • October 21 2015 – Jewish Sarah Lawrence College Student (Andi) “I’ve become a persona non grata to some. [As the president of the campus Hillel and one of few openly pro-Israel students at a school], [I’ve] grown accustomed to threatening messages on social media, listserv discussions that single [me] out by name, and icy stares and purposeful whispers when [I] pass by…I didn’t want to come back this semester, and my mom really didn’t want me to come back…If I had known what I would face here, I would not have signed up.” Read more
  • October 21 2015 – Jewish Sarah Lawrence College Student (Andi) (After arranging for a pro-Israel event on campus) – “The anger, the hate was so real…[the days leading up the event were] hysteria…Friends who had nothing to do with the event unfriended [me] on Facebook, and many stopped talking to [me] in person. I felt isolated and alone.”)Read more

 

Stanford University:

 

  • May 27, 2016 – Stanford University Student (Matthew) “[The Stanford Review poll] demonstrates that Stanford students have an understanding of just how problematic and dangerous BDS really is.” Read More
  • April 14, 2016 – Stanford University Jewish Student (Matthew) “I would tell people that it was hurtful and people would tell me, ‘That’s not anti-Semitic, that’s true. Jews do control everything.’ ” Read more
  • April 7, 2016 – Stanford University Jewish Student Association Open Letter “We are concerned that this [latest antisemitic incident] represents a larger problem on our campus, where anti-Jewish bias remains unconfronted and left to fester.”  Read More
  • April 7, 2016 – Stanford University Jewish Student Association Open Letter “Senator Knight implied that Jews exercise coordinated control over various societal institutions. With this remark, on the record in an ASSU meeting, he treated these dangerous stereotypes as though they were acceptable discourse among student leadership, and by extension the student body, which is extremely alarming to us in the JSA.”  Read More
  • April 6, 2016 – Stanford University Student (Harry) “Seven ASSU Senators yesterday declared that “delegitimization” of Israel – a clear standard used by the US State Department – should not count as anti-semitic on campus. Time and time again, Senators argued against “recognizing the Jewish people’s right to self-determination in their ancestral homeland.” If they knew more about the history of the persecution of the Jews, and their denial of a place they could call home, perhaps they would have reconsidered.” Read more
  • April 3, 2016 – Stanford University Jewish Student (Michal) “…of the three times I have seriously considered leaving Stanford, each one was related to the state of anti-Semitism or anti-Zionism on campus.” Read more
  • November 13, 2015 – Jewish Stanford University Student (Miriam) “One of the main issues confronting Jewish students who face anti-Semitism on college campuses is the lack of attention to their concerns. While I tried to bring to light some of the anti-Semitic Stanford Yaks, no one seemed to pay much notice. When Jewish students complain about being subject to anti-Semitism, we are told that Jews are wealthy and successful, so anti-Semitism is no longer a problem; that it’s only an issue in Europe; that threats are not serious or are “just jokes” and we need to move on; that other minority groups have it way worse. That is, assuming we are not flat-out ignored, or, as during the divestment debate at Stanford, ridiculed and laughed at for our concerns.” Read more
  • May 23, 2015 – Stanford University Jewish Student (Liana) “The night of the first [divestment] vote, one of the pro-divestment students got up and shouted ‘Long live the intifada’ and stormed out of the room. That was extremely disturbing.” Read more
  • May 21, 2015 – Stanford University Student (Liana) – “some Jewish students on [my] campus feel they have to hide who they are. [I] know several who tuck their Star of David necklaces inside their shirts, self-conscious about drawing attention to their Jewish identity.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student (Miriam) – “A lot of this stuff has shown me that people don’t understand what anti-Semitism is and think it doesn’t exist in the U.S. anymore or that it can’t happen at Stanford.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student (Molly) – “Over this year it’s gotten a lot worse for me. I feel like the climate has definitely changed and there seems to be less room for dialogue.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student (Naom) – “…I do believe that the issue of anti-Semitism is one that has been somewhat shoved under the rug this year on this campus” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student & President of Stanford Israel Association (Liane) – “I don’t want to speculate to the cause of the vandalism [swastikas on a Fraternity], but after divestment, there has been a rise in hostility towards Jewish communities…many student groups have started refusing to co-sponsor events with the Stanford Israel Association.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student & Past Senator (Zane) – “…this is not the first time that Jews on campus have been told that something is not anti-Semitic by those who are not a part of the Jewish community… Just as it would be reprehensible for the JSA to tell members of other minority communities what is and is not racist, sexist or homophobic, I find it personally atrocious that members who are not participants in the Jewish community at Stanford would clearly state for the campus as a whole that their own actions were not anti-Semitic.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish Stanford Student & Senate Candidate (Molly) – “Across from me in the room sat eight members of SOCC, who took notes throughout the interview. Part way through the lead interviewer asked me, “Given your strong Jewish identity, how would you vote on divestment?” I couldn’t quite process that I had actually been asked this question. Did me being Jewish mean I wasn’t qualified to serve on Senate? Did SOCC doubt my commitment to serving students of color on the basis that I am Jewish? Somewhat stunned, I asked for clarification. The SOCC interviewer responded that she had noticed I talked about my Jewish identity in the application and was wondering how this would affect my decision on divestment.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Stanford Student & Founder of Coalition for Peace (Ben) – “It’s beginning to take hold. We’re seeing the beginnings of hatred” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Stanford Student (Sophie) – “I am discouraged to know that I am not the only student who has felt silenced and marginalized by SJP; as a result, many students are afraid to speak up about similar personal interactions. The stories that I have heard and continue to hear concerning the divisiveness of SJP and SOOP events hosted in the wake of the ASSU divestment bill vote illustrate the strident climate and vitriol on campus that it breeds. Sadly, this has been the experience of students on other college campuses as well.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Hillel at Stanford Newsletter – “Hillel staff are hearing numerous reports from students that they no longer feel safe at Stanford, feel ostracized and targeted, and are unable to express their identities and opinions in the dorms and around campus. Last night, a panel of Jewish students spoke at a Coalition for Peace event, “The Case Against Divestment.” One student, a JD/MBA who served as a lone soldier in the IDF, shared that she now feels uncomfortable at Stanford wearing a Jewish star.”

 

SUNY at Abany:

 

  • April 13, 2016 – SUNY Albany Jewish Student (Alex) – “Last year, [on November 14, 2015, my school] had the ‘From Ferguson to Palestine’ rally and my friend put up a sign that said, ‘Jews believe Black lives matter, too’ or something like that, and [anti-Israel students] took a picture of it and made a meme out of it saying ‘Zionists be like lives matter. What a joke.’ And it immediately blew up. It had thousands of anti-Semitic comments, anti-Israel comments, racist comments, bigoted comments, and that was a great shock for me, because my university is 28 percent Jewish. I never expected anything like that to happen at my university.” Read more

 

SUNY at Buffalo:

 

  • March 29, 2016 – University of Buffalo Jewish Student (Andrew) – “I’ve never seen any form of anti-Semitism like that before. I’ve seen swastikas in the past, but that is nothing compared to this..the most horrific and derogatory term [used against Jewish people].” Read more

 

Swarthmore University:

 

  • February 11, 2016 – Swarthmore College Jewish Student (Bill) – “Social justice activism has mostly failed to treat ambiguous identities, particularly the Jewish identity, with nuance. I have spent four years trying to fit my Jewishness—an identity I’ve never fully fit within and never fully fit without—into the popular social justice paradigm that dominates Swarthmore’s intellectual life. Perhaps I’m simply not up to the task. But perhaps this failure to fit into one half or another of a dichotomy is not just a failure of my imagination. Perhaps the world cannot be split so easily in two.” Read more
  • February 2015 – Swarthmore Student (Nat) – “Students with a clear Zionist perspective are labeled and excluded from the discussion. We have been told we do not belong at this school, that our voices do not belong in the dialogue. We have been accused of supporting apartheid and of being racist. These are some of the “kinder” words and allegations that have been repeatedly hurled at us when we attempt to speak about our beliefs.” Read more

 

Temple University:

 

  • Mar 2015 – Temple University Student (Marissa) – “I’m tired of antisemitism being a completely normal occurrence, and people standing idly by because as long as they are only going after the Jews nobody cares. ” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – Temple University Student (Marissa) – “I’m tired of seeing the nail marks on my door from where the mezuzah was forcibly ripped from the wall.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – Temple University Student (Marissa) – “I’m tired of having to walk through antisemitic rallies occurring in the middle of campus.” Read more

 

Texas Christian University:

 

  • January 7, 2016 – Texas Christian University Jewish Student (Dalton) – (After finding five Nazi-era identification Stars of David hot glued to the walls leading up to his dorm room in December 2015)“ There was one right outside my room. My doorway was decorated for the holiday for Hanukkah. It certainly is intimidating that kind of thing. It’s a symbol of hatred.” (Note – The student moved out of his first semester dorm at Moncreif Hall following this incident.) Read more
  • December 15, 2015 – Texas Christian University Jewish Student (Dalton) – “ I’ve lived through a lot but never have I felt more hated or targeted for my religion.” Read more
  • December 16, 2015 – Texas Christian University Jewish Student (Dalton) – “I definitely felt unsafe. What scared me the most was how specific it was and the effort that one would have to go through to do something like that” Read more

 

Towson University:

 

  • October 13, 2015 – Jewish Towson University Student(Rebecca) “I’m Jewish, I’m from a small town, people are mean, but never had I experienced anything like this. Prior to this, I hadn’t seen any incidents of anti-Semitism on campus. I was shocked.” Read more

 

Trinity College:

 

  • April 26, 2016 – Trinity College Hillel Director (Lisa) – “[T]wo Jewish students went to Hillel after attending the film screening [of “Occupation of the American Mind”]  in considerable distress as a result of the messages of the film and discussion. “ Read more

 

University of Arizona:

 

  • May 6, 2015 – Jewish University of Arizona Student (Alexis) “Never in their wildest dreams would my parents have imagined that I would feel threatened or frightened over the fact that I am Jewish on an American college campus. The reality of the situation is that anti-Semitism and anti-Semitism masked, as anti-Zionism, has become the new reality of many college campuses throughout the country.” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Jewish University of Arizona Student (Gideon) -describing his multiple experiences with antisemitism “I had a skull fracture, lower back fracture, bleeding in the brain and a concussion” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Jewish University of Arizona Student (Gideon) -describing his multiple experience with antisemitism “At that point he starts backing off with his hand raised saluting Hitler and he runs into a house right next to our house and comes out with 20-guys” Read more

 

University of California, Berkeley:

  • October 14, 2015 – University of Berkeley Jewish Student (Sarah) “As Jews, many of us experience a climate of anti-Semitism on the UC Berkeley campus, if not in the larger East Bay area. However, few people are willing to acknowledge our reality.” Read more
  • June 12, 2015 – University of Berkeley Jewish Student (Ori)– “Anti-Semitism is brushed off. A lot of times, students don’t even know about [the antisemitic graffiti] because it’s just scrubbed off.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – Jewish UC Berkeley Student (Ori)“We still find anti-Semitic slogans written on bathrooms. We see swastikas on doors still, but they’re kind of dismissed. They’re painted over because there are just so many things that happened. A lot of students find swastikas and come to me. [They see it] on dorms, on bathroom stalls, just random places on campus.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – Jewish UC Berkeley Student (Ori)“[Ori] says the Jewish undergraduates who come to him are often scared” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – Jewish UC Berkeley Student (Ori)“If anti-Semitic events occur all over Berkeley, they [the administration] should make students feel safe.” Read more

University of California, Davis :

  • April 6, 2016 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Mikaela) “As a tour guide on campus, I have seen the concerns that prospective Jewish students and their families have had in regard to increases in anti-Israel activity and anti-Semitic incidents at UC Davis and other UC campuses…If things do not improve soon, I foresee that the UC schools risk having a rapid decrease in Jewish students over the next few years.” Read more
  • April 6, 2016 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Mikaela) “I have been involved with the pro-Israel movement on campus for over two years, and what I and many of my peers have experienced because of our views on Israel has been nothing short of discrimination. Particularly in my capacity as a senator, both members of the senate and senate candidates have refused to work with me because of my views on Israel.” Read more
  • March 15, 2016 – UC Davis Jewish Student (Mandy) “I don’t feel comfortable wearing a Jewish star anymore and depending on certain classes, if I am wearing a symbol of being Jewish I’ll hide it. Anything from assumptions made about you to questions about your opinions on Israel, to being accused of being a Zionist.” Read More
  • October 13, 2015 – UC Davis Student (Matthew) note: following 2 cars etched with swastikas and “Expletive Jews” and other cars with slashed tires – “It’s just shocking for me as a Jew to see such hatefulness right outside my doorstep.” [My roomates car tire was slashed]…”It jeopardized her life. She was on the freeway and her car in danger, and everyone in the car in danger.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Julia)“Campus climate has definitely shifted as of lately. The resolution is inherently divisive and is causing many students to feel marginalized on campus.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Julia)“The divestment resolution has instigated many acts of intolerance on campus against the Jewish community” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) (article about UC Davis)“It’s an absurd reality that many Jewish college students have to question: is my college safe for me?” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) (article about UC Davis)“The divestment campaign against university involvement with Israel has proven to divide college campuses and distance students away from valuable dialogue about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It is this divisive nature that has pushed a narrative that refuses to acknowledge the complicated history and nature of the conflict to deliberately demonize Israel, and those who call it home.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – SDSU Student (Anthony) (article about UC Davis)“While it’s inaccurate to say that all divestment supporters on college campuses are anti-Semitic, it’s socially irresponsible to deny that the divestment campaign fosters an environment where anti-Semitism and hate are easier to occur.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UC Davis Student (Nadine)- “To me, the campus resolution to divest from Israel is no more than a mere extension of the same kind of hatred and condescension that I have experienced for much of my life. It brings back many of the same feelings for me that I had when I was younger, and makes me feel that I am once again in a position where others want me to apologize and feel wrong or ashamed for my beliefs and what I stand for. The invariable end result of the passing of this resolution will be the isolation of a very select group of students on campus, which is absolutely abhorrent. It will only create a larger divide among members of the student body who have conflicting viewpoints on this contentious issue and may lead to more intense altercations on campus. This would be due to the highly offensive, aggressive, and misleading rhetoric often used by pro-divestment groups to get their points across, including associating Israel’s actions with genocide and ethnic cleansing. The ASUCD support for this resolution promotes the idea that the majority of the student body also supports the beliefs of pro-divestment groups, further empowering their arguments and spreading their twisted logic to the UC Davis community as the “correct” or “majority” opinion. Consequently, I no longer feel as though UC Davis is a completely safe environment for Jewish students or a place where I can feel free to express my support for Israel.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UC Davis Student (Kristin)- “The BDS movement has no place for public consensus from a student panel that is inherently created to represent all student interests. All it does is pit two ethnic student groups against each other in a hateful and divisive way. The student senate’s decision to pass a resolution to divest from Israel places Jewish students in a separate category, isolating and pushing them into a defensive position.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Jonathan)- “BDS will not stop until the United States and Israel have no relationship, until every Jewish student hides away in fear.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Jonathan)- “BDS is the start of a movement that is greater than we can comprehend. We can sit in our homes and hope that everything will be just fine, as it has been in my lifetime, but the trend in the world right now is that people are no longer afraid to openly speak out against Jews. Anti-Semitic behavior is becoming normal. From the standpoint of these students, they are rewarded for their behavior, not restrained. Do you think they will stop?” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Nathaniel) -describing swastikas at the AEPi house following passage of a BDS resolution at UC Davis “From that [BDS] bill, there have been Facebook posts that have been unbelievably derogatory toward Jews” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Nathaniel) – “I don’t think that it’s a coincidence that this happened right after divestment. I’m also not making any assumptions or blaming anyone in particular, but I feel like there were a lot of anti-semitism feelings after divestment.” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Nathaniel) – “Jewish people still can’t feel safe on their own campuses and in their own houses. Anti-Semitism still exists today. It’s not a fairy tale” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Nicole) – “I never thought this would happen here. I personally feel like I’ve been targeted, as well. The swastika is internationally known as a Nazi symbol to kill the Jews, so I do feel targeted by this” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish Federation of Sacramento President (Barry) – “There’s been any number of incidents, including at Davis and elsewhere, where Jewish students are simply approached on campus and sort of yelled at and screamed at” Read more
  • Jan 2015 – Jewish UC Davis Student (Joshua)- “It’s 2015 and were still fighting swastikas on Jewish people’s houses.” Read more

 

University of California Irvine:

 

  • May 23, 2016 – Former President of UCI Anteaters for Israel (Sharon) – “SJP and MSU (the Muslim Student Association) have a documented history of violence on this campus, specifically violence against Jewish students, myself a victim numerous times, [and my] friends victimized, and their history of sabotaging Jewish events and intimidating Jewish students. Although I am grateful the police were there to do something, the wrong students were escorted out.” Read more
  • May 23, 2016 – Former IDF soldier and speaker at an event on campus (Eran) – “They were banging on the glass and the door and we could hear screaming outside. The students had a look of panic on their faces—they were terrified. Finally the police arrived, pushed the protesters back a little, and escorted us to our cars.” Read more
  • May 20, 2016 – UC Irvine Jewish Student (Eliana) – “I was terrified. There is no other word to describe how I felt.” Read more
  • May 19, 2016 – UC Irvine SSI President (Katrin) – “They were screaming. They tried to push open the door, but we were holding the door from the inside. They had a lawyer with them who said (they had) a right to come in. They were disrupting our event. This is not freedom of speech. It’s harassment. Intifada for me is anti-Semitic.” Read more

 

University of California Los Angeles (UCLA):

 

  • July 18, 2016 – UCLA Student Leader (Milan) – “I gained first-hand exposure to how the BDS movement has created a hostile and unsafe campus climate at American universities. I especially empathize with my Jewish fellow students, who are being systematically harassed and bullied by this movement.” Read more
  • June 17, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Anonymous) “The connection that SJP makes between the fact that we are Jewish and their protest of what’s happening to the Palestinians is representative of the issue with anti-Semitism. There needs to be a clear separation between criticism of Israel and BDS. I have no responsibility for what happens in Israel just because I’m Jewish, and they certainly don’t need to persecute me on campus because of that.” Read more
  • June 1, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Oleg) – “Luckily there hasn’t been any violence but I would say that Zionist students and Jewish students in general have really been singled out in terms of having their loyalty questioned, in terms of these old anti-Semitic canards of can someone be Jewish and really be pro-American, do Jews put their interests above anyone else.” Read more
  • May 26, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Students (Inbar & Tali) – “The serious charge of ethnic cleansing against Israel (by others in the Daily Bruin) – a term used to characterize genocides in Rwanda and Armenia, mass atrocities in Congo and the Holocaust – is not just baseless. It is hateful and discriminatory, leveled in our university’s primary public forum, the Daily Bruin, to demonize Israel – and create a hostile environment for pro-Israel and Jewish students.” Read more
  • April 20, 2016 – UCLA Student (Milan) “I cannot support any movement that harasses and bullies students due to their viewpoints or religious beliefs. I sympathize with my Jewish classmates for the hostile and unsafe campus climate that BDS has created for them at UCLA. UCLA needs to take leadership and control BDS’s bullying of student leaders.” Read more
  • March 29, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Omer) “I would say it’s very hostile and it’s a treacherous environment because of anti-normalization, and the only times we get to speak is during hotbed situations, enforcing negative associations and embedding miscommunication” February 4, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) – “Over the course of what was probably no longer than an hour, my history was denied, the murder of my people was justified, and a movement whose sole purpose is the destruction of the Jewish homeland was glorified. Statements were made justifying the ruthless murder of innocent Israeli civilians, blatantly denying Jewish indigeneity in the land, and denying the Holocaust in which six million Jews were murdered. Why anyone in their right mind would accept these slanders as truths baffles me. But they did. These statements, and others, were met with endless snaps and cheers. I was taken aback.” Read more
  • February 4, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Rosenberg) “When I heard that among my peers that “the Jews are oppressors and murderers—How can you care about students of color on campus when they’re murdering our people abroad?”—it quickly dawned on me that it wasn’t that they don’t like us because we’re pro-Israel—they don’t like us because we’re Jews. We were targeted.” Read more
  • February 3, 2016 – UCLA Jewish Student (Matan) “Advocating for the establishment of a Palestinian state or advocating on behalf of the Palestinian people should not require calling for the destruction of the Jewish state and justifying the murder of the Jewish people. In the last years, SJP has unapologetically employed such rhetoric and imagery. This rhetoric can be seen in footage of SJP chapters across the University of California, including SJP at UCLA, chanting, ‘From the river to the sea, Palestine will be free.’” Read more
  • December 26, 2015 – UCLA Jewish student (Arielle) “In just a little over a year at UCLA I have interacted with remnants of anti-Semitism far too often. They come in the form of “conversations” about Israel, speeches about purported human rights, and eligibility for student leadership positions. It is the new normal and it is numbing…Anti-Semitism is alive and well all over the world – least of all at a revered higher education institution like UCLA…This is the reality of being a Jewish student on a UC campus today.” Read more
  • December 17, 2015 – UCLA Jewish student (Liat) “The recent rise in anti-Semitism at UC is directly related to BDS. BDS injects hatred onto the campus and breeds anti-Semitism. It pits students against each other and is blatant discrimination. Students repeatedly report that during and immediately after BDS debates, there is a dramatic increase in swastikas and harassment on campus.” Read more
  • June 11, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Lauren) – “SJP brought forward an anti-Israel divestment resolution to our student council. BDS, or the anti-Israel Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions campaign had arrived in full-force at UCLA. Several of us on council suggested pro-peace, pro-dialogue alternatives. But these anti-Israel groups wanted nothing to do with anything positive. We ended up having a 12 hour public hearing where students were yelling at each other. Watch it on youtube. Several of us noted our frustration with divestment and anti-Israel language being the only solution SJP was willing to accept.” Read more
  • May 3, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) – “Over the course of this year, my Jewish identity was politicized and attacked.” Read more
  • May 3, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Unnamed Student) – “When coming to UCLA, I knew I would have to defend my pro-Israel identity. Never did I think I would have to defend my Jewish identity.” Read more
  • May 3, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) – “The systematic delegitimization, demonization and setting of double standards in relation to the Jewish state has led to the delegitimization, demonization and setting of double standards in relation to the Jewish people. It would be naive not to recognize the clear correlation between anti-Israel, anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic activity on college campuses.” Read more
  • May 3, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) – “The boycott, divestment and sanctions (BDS) movement and its champions on college campuses clearly incite hate against Jewish students and the Jewish people. It is on campuses that legitimize the BDS movement where anti-Semitic Yik Yaks are posted, where phrases such as “Hitler did nothing wrong” can be found etched into tables in the cafeteria, where it is socially acceptable to wear T-shirts that read “Israel Kills” and where it is OK to almost deny a Jewish student a position of leadership based solely on her religious identity.” Read more
  • May 3, 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) – “What these people fail to recognize is the clear cause of the blatant rise in hatred of Jews — the rise of the BDS movement. Jewish students are being attacked — not because they are Jewish but because the Jewish state is Jewish, and they as Jews, have somehow become extensions of the Jewish state and its policies. Our identities as Jewish students on this campus have been politicized, time and again…” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Miriam P.) “…the campus climate has been pretty hostile, and it would not be politically expedient to take a public stance [on Israel]” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) “…we silently pray that this will be the last one-sided resolution, the last slanderous op-ed, the last malicious Facebook post we will have to face.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Arielle) “…with the current state of campus discourse and the incessant attacks by the BDS movement and groups hell-bent on Israel’s destruction, it’s easy to become disillusioned. To be quite honest, it is exhausting to constantly have to defend Israel against the lies, the slander and the misperceptions the anti-Israel community throws our way. Unfortunately, this year, it took a turn for the worst: not only do we have to defend our pro-Israel identities, we are now forced to defend our Jewish identities, as was the case with the Judicial Board appointment at UCLA.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Tammy) “…we are fighting an uphill battle every time we try to stop the Israel Apartheid rhetoric, because we are accused of limiting freedom of speech. Yet they wanted to limit our freedoms, as evidenced with the Rachel Beyda incident. After it, many of us had breakfast with the chancellor and told him how disappointed we were that he waited to write his letter about Rachel Beyda. He apologized.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Rebecca) Rebecca attempted to engage students who put up the Israel Apartheid Wall on campus. The discourse was respectful, with a give-and-take, until the student saw her necklace that identified Rebecca as Jewish. From that moment on, she didn’t looked her in the eye and refused to continue the conversation. Rebecca explains, “I was really bothered, since she refused to talk to me only because I was Jewish. She utterly disrespected me. It became obvious it was not OK to have a dialogue with people who want to challenge the facts. They do not want any dialogue.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – UCLA Jewish Graduate & Student President of Hillel at UCLA (Natalie) “People say that being anti-Israel is not the same as being anti-semitic. The problem is the anti-Israel culture in which we are singling out only the Jewish state creates an environment where it is ok to single out Jewish students.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – UCLA Jewish Graduate (Arielle) “Nowadays, Jewish students on college campuses are encouraged to do the same.We are forced to “not be so public” about our Jewish identities. We are expected to be experts on all facets of Judaism and explain them on cue. We are assumed to be blind supporters of the Jewish state and manifestations of its government. And, between combating Divestment resolutions, defending ourselves against anti-Semitism and constantly trying to afford our peers context, we have lost sight of what we really came to these universities for: an education.” Read more
  • Mar 2015 – UCLA Jewish Graduate (Shani) “I found myself extremely uncomfortable walking to Shabbat dinners at Hillel, the center for Jewish life on campus. I was hesitant to apply to the Daily Bruin, fearing my ethnicity would lower my chances of getting accepted. I nearly questioned my entire future of pursuing journalism, fearing my Jewish last name would label me as incapable of being unbiased. None of this is true, but divestment put me, along with several other Jewish students, in this place of discomfort, regardless of our political affiliations. Divestment began to put Jewish students in a pro-Israel box, mixing up religion with politics, and leading to the growth of anti-Semitism at UCLA.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UCLA Student & President of USAC (Avinoam) –NOTE: Comment is made in response to a student government meeting where a Jewish student candidate for the Judicial Board was questioned on whether her being Jewish was a “conflict of interest.” “It was definitely very difficult for me to sit there as they were discussing the appointment and were quite clearly biased against her because of her Jewish identity and her affiliation to the community. As a Jewish student, this for me echoed a centuries-long sort of connotation of Jews being unable to be truly loyal.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish UCLA Student & Roomate of Jewish Student Discriminated by Student Gov’t (Rachel F.) “The Jewish community at UCLA is really strong. That’s not to say that I feel comfortable at all parts of the school. It gets to be a hostile environment in, especially, the student government area.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UCLA Jewish Graduate (Miri) “[The UCSA resolution means] the pro-Israel voice is not welcome [at U.C.]. It’s quite terrifying for pro-Israel students on campus. BDS is very dangerous. What students don’t realize is it is part of a global movement to demonize Israel and wipe it off the map.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Alexandra) “…I am tired of the way slate politics along divestment lines has destroyed my campus culture and made me silent.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Alexandra) “I had cut Jewish words, Jewish activities and Jewish foods out of my life. I had even stopped telling people I met that I was Jewish. Because, frankly, I was scared to speak up.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – UCLA Jewish Student (Alexandra) “That we have reached a point in 2015 where it is acceptable to support denying a student a position outright, merely because she is Jewish, is unbelievable.” Read more
  • Dec 2014 – UCLA Graduate Student (Deb) “I have personally felt marginalized as a person; that’s a feeling, that’s absolutely my experience and I’ve also had emails targeted at me post-elections on my Facebook” – From an audience member transcription of a Workshop on Academic Boycotts sponsored by Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies at UCLA.
  • Dec 2014 – UCLA Jewish Student (Josh) “My name is Josh. I’m one of the organizers of the opposition to the BDS vote on this campus. I can tell you from personal experience there are people in the graduate student population who oppose BDS, some of who have signed up to be our volunteers and when it came time and we said, “Will you please put up a poster?” they said, “No.” we said, “will you please approach your friends and talk to them about it.” They said, “No.” what was the concern? The concern was that they were going to be marginalized, that they would be stigmatized because they were opposed to BDS. And this we heard again and again and again, not just from our volunteers but from people who we reached out to..[T]his campaign in and of itself is succeeding at its goal because if you want to boycott academics, you are saying that certain ideas and idea makers that are simply outside of the pale, that those are the ideas and idea makers that we shun in our university. And just holding this vote has had an effect on the students of this community, of showing… students of this community that they are on the wrong side and it has had a silencing effect… in narrowing the discourse and that is precisely what I would describe is the purpose of this academic boycott.” – From an audience member transcription of a Workshop on Academic Boycotts sponsored by Y&S Nazarian Center for Israel Studies at UCLA.
  • Nov 2014 – UCLA Jewish & Israeli Student (Avinoam) “[The resolution] says this language that it’s not meant to target you, but there’s a difference between intention and action and if our intention is to divest from all countries violating human rights and the actual effect is to only divest from Israel, the only Jewish state in the world, it’s hard for me to take it any other way.. It’s hard for me to not feel targeted.” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – UCLA Jewish Student (Natalie) “We didn’t [want to] subject Jewish students, pro-Israel students, to the hate that is in this room” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – UCLA Jewish Student (Omer) “I am thankful that we did not have to bring our entire community to sit through that [divestment meeting]… “That would’ve been heartbreaking. Look at it now—it’s already heartbreaking for the six of us that came.” Read more
  • July 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avi) –Unfortunately, this recent attack is representative of a new breed of bullying on our campuses in which baseless attacks are leveled against the integrity of individuals.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and President of Bruins for Israel (Miriam) – “As a result of divestment, not only my mental stability but also my academics have suffered. These attacks on my identity and rights to self-determination have not only affected me emotionally, but have had devastating effects on my academics and have hindered my purpose on this campus—to be a student. It is ridiculous to me that at such a world-renowned university, our education is being put on hold because my identity is being put on trial.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and Article Author (Tessa)– “Many of us felt precisely the same way. And in the aftermath of the divestment decision, our feelings were unfortunately confirmed. An eruption of hate targeted council members with extreme cyberbullying from students who disagreed with their stance…” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and Article Author (Tessa) “As a student in the audience, I watched with a sense of helplessness as blocks of students went up to the microphone to gush hate, bias, and one-sided claims from all sides of the divestment advocacy spectrum.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and Article Author (Tessa) – “[D]uring the past year at the University of California, Los Angeles, pro-Israel and pro-Palestinian tensions have reached a climax—partly because there are no longer just two voices fighting against each other, but multiple voices fighting against one. UCLA has seen the mobilization of self-identified minority communities banding together in order to combat the terrors they believe Israel inflicts on the world, and a concerted effort by pro-Palestinian organization to exploit this to their advantage and silence pro-Israel voices on campus.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avinoam) – “I felt personally attacked, singled-out and targeted because of my views on political issues such as divestment. Because of the divestment issue, I have lost numerous friends, done poorly in my classes, and overall have never felt so unwelcome at this university.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and Article Author (Tessa) – “Days before the end of the winter quarter, the Muslim Student Association published an official press statement condemning Islamophobic speech, and asked councilmembers and student groups to sign in solidarity. While the underlying idea of denouncing Islamophobia is a commendable one, the statement included language that was offensive to students who support the Jewish state of Israel, since it made a distinction between anti-Zionism and anti-Semitism.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and President of BFI (Miriam) – “It is definitely difficult to be a pro-Israel, Jewish student at UCLA right now. In the recent months, I have felt personally attacked by members of the UCLA community. Our campus climate has only grown more hostile.” Read more
  • June 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student and Article Author (Tessa) – “For myself and other Jewish and pro-Israel students, the atmosphere is poisonous. We feel attacked, ostracized, and threatened. Our identities are being rejected and our right to express our beliefs endangered. Our academic performance is being harmed unjustly; and our supporters are now targets of hate campaigns, baseless accusations, and unfair political and social retaliation.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish Israeli UCLA Student (Omer)“[W]hile I strongly believe in constructive criticism of Israel and its policies, the discourse about Israel on my campus degenerates into hate speech on a far-too-regular basis. The blatant and offensive lies uttered during public comment represent a vile and unwarranted attack on Israel, pro-Israel students, and the organized Jewish community at UCLA. What was even more disheartening for me was that no councilmembers, faculty advisors, or leaders in the pro-divestment community stood up and condemned the hate speech directed against us.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish Israeli UCLA Student (Omer) – “In addition to slanderous claims against Israel, there were numerous offensive statements directed at my community. We were condescendingly told that divestment does not threaten us, as if others have the right to define how student government actions do or do not affect us. We were told that by opposing divestment, we are tying Jewish identity to oppression, racism, and human rights violations – an extremely dehumanizing accusation which silences and caricatures our actual concerns about the issue. We constantly hear the term “Zionist” used as a dirty word, as if supporting the liberation and self-determination of a historically oppressed minority in its homeland is something to be ashamed of. And worst of all, we heard speakers attempt to put down our objections by falsely redefining the term “anti-Semitism,” extending it beyond hatred of Jews. Attempting to change the meaning of this term is more than just a blatant misuse of language. It effectively minimizes the 1,900 year history of racism and oppression targeted specifically against Jews in Europe, the Middle East, and elsewhere.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish Israeli UCLA Student (Omer) – “Opponents of Israel at my university consistently make slanderous accusations, many of which can only be described as demonization and hate speech. These statements may not reflect malicious intentions on the part of individual students, but that changes nothing about how offensive they are. ” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish Israeli UCLA Student (Omer) – “As a member of the organized Jewish community at UCLA, I see lies and hate speech as more than just a cause of discomfort, marginalization, and negative campus climate. In the past, lies about the Jewish people have led directly to mass violence and oppression against us. ” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish Israeli UCLA Student (Omer) – “This spreading of lies and targeting of specific people on the pro-Israel side continues today weeks after the resolution did not pass as there is consistent cyber bullying, targeting of specific council members who voted against it,and an attempted delegitimization of our student government all over Facebook. ” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avi L.) – “I’m a student who identifies as a Jewish Zionist. As a result of my identity, and involvement in on-campus activism, I’ve been labeled as a quote ‘ZiZi’, shorthand for “Zionist Nazi,’ a quote “radical right winger,” a quote “white supremacist crying about my white privilege” among other things. To say that this sort of name calling is grotesque would be an understatement.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avi L.) – “In my three years at Cal, I’ve noticed that North American college campuses haven’t even become a close substitute as a safe place to practice our Judaism. This is reflected in our native campus climate.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avi L.) – “This is the trade-off many Jewish students have to consider when they decide what will I get involved in my four years at college? Will I get involved with my culture and my identity and subject myself to intimidation and harassment; or will I pursue some other passion…” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish UCLA Student (Avi L.) – “Just because someone is allowed to say something doesn’t mean that we need to tacitly endorse it. And that’s what we need from our leadership. We need to be able to, when there is a hateful divestment resolution that’s labeling me as a ‘Zionist Nazi’ when my grandfather has a number tattooed on his arm – to say that this is not OK.” Read more

 

University of California, San Diego (UCSD):

 

  • September 2015 – Jewish UC San Diego Student (Sara) (note, student is describing encountering a fellow UC San Diego student, who is a member of SJP, in a club who recognized her) – “I have felt uncomfortable around this student for the past two years and he saw me at a night club…And after he saw me, he confronted me with nothing but hate and would not leave me alone…They followed me, and called me by my first and last name. They were yelling that I was a ‘racist Zionist cow.’ I have never felt so unsafe in my life. I didn’t know anyone would actually come in my face or put me in danger until tonight. This problem is way more serious than I had imagined.” Read more

 

University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB):

 

  • April 2015 – Commentator & Witness at Divestment Meeting (Jerome) “I won’t comment on the Israel-Palestine conflict, nor on the divestment bill, although I attended the meeting on Wednesday. I’ll say only this much: when you say, “if any other minority had voiced these same concerns regarding any other resolution, no administration would dare question the validity of their feelings,” I have to agree with you. The Jewish people attending the meeting were largely on the defensive; if they had spoken about Palestinians in the same way that members of SJP spoke about Jews, there would be rampant outrage and labeling of Islamophobia. My personal feelings about divestment aside, I agree that this is a double standard.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Margaux) “I am ostracized and made fun of by majority groups because I am different, yet at the same time, I am not even afforded the decency of being recognized as a minority by other minority groups. Sadly, last night’s events only reminded me how truly alone the Jewish community is and continues to remain.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Margaux) “I am frustrated because, after reading this, most people still will not understand how difficult it is to wake up in a world ridden with anti-Semitism every single day. Bigoted stereotypes of Jews having power and control have become so ingrained in our society that it they have succeeded in invalidating Jewish people’s legitimate feelings of marginalization.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Margaux) “I am exhausted of constantly having to defend my own identity to everyone. It is not fair that I should have to go to great lengths to prove that someone’s words are internally damaging to my own self-worth while such measures would never be required of any other minority.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Margaux) “…I am disgusted by the normalization of anti-Semitic language so casually thrown around at the meeting. In those eight hours, I was told that Jews control the government, that all Jews are rich, that Zionism is racism, that the marginalization of Jewish students is justified because it prevents the marginalization of other minority groups, that Israel sterilizes its Ethiopian women (this is obviously not true), and that Palestinians in America who speak out against Israel are sought out by the IDF and denied entrance into Israel (also a ridiculous conspiracy theory). I heard a senator—someone who is supposed to be my representative—say that people were only voting against this resolution because they were afraid of losing “Jew support.” I heard my peers laugh at the mention of terrorists hurling stones at the heads of Israeli civilians intending to kill them. I saw students smile and cheer enthusiastically as a woman stood up and said the words, “I am ashamed to be a Jew.” The rhetoric I heard from students opposing Israel at this meeting could easily be equated to arguments that I have only seen in quotes at museums or mentioned in textbooks for their use in the justification of historical persecution of the Jewish race.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Sarah) “I just think it’s important for people to know that if our community sees this resolution as anti-Semitic that we should be listened to” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Michelle) “Rejecting this resolution does not mean opposing the rights of Palestinians; it means refusing to accept an agenda, promoted by this resolution; that the only way in which UCSB students can support Palestinians is by tearing down Jews and Israel, and by ultimately making the Jewish people stateless” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Michelle) “The divestment resolution creates a framework that alienates Jewish students at UCSB, in part because it establishes a clear link to the BDS movement,” Moreh said. “Moreover, the attempt to draw parallels between Israel and South Africa under apartheid is ignorant and offensive on many levels.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Alejandro) “I believe the resolution definitely alienates the Israeli community, and through it, the Jewish community. As a student who studied in Israel and whose family lives there, I could not help but feel attacked and singled out as I walked past the divestment wall in the Arbor.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Jack) “On this board [the apartheid wall constructed by SJP] it says Zionism equals racism … the general definition of Zionism is the belief in having a nation for the Jewish people free from persecution with the right of self-determination. Saying that idea is racism — the existence of a Jewish state is racism — personally affronts my belief in the idea that I can have a place as a Jew where I am free from persecution.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Michelle) “I’ve grown up Jewish. It’s a huge part of my identity, and it’s been really difficult to come to campus and see so much anti-Semitism that affects us today. I hadn’t really been exposed to this much anti-Semitism until I got to UCSB.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Michelle) “As the university system that has been at the forefront of social justice… we still have swastikas being spray painted on Jewish fraternities at other UC schools. We still have student senators publicly endorsing the demise of the one Jewish state in the world, and we still have a candidate of UCLA’s judicial bored being discriminated against on the basis of her Jewish identity, and we still have flyers at UCSB blaming Jews for 9/11. So we should have done this [resolution against antisemitism] after the first incident happened, we shouldn’t have waited for Jews to be targeted again.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Arezu) “I used to wear a golden star of David necklace around my neck. One day, I was stopped on the street by an older woman. She praised me for having the courage to wear my necklace with pride… It wasn’t until I stepped out of my bubble, out of my comfort zone, and onto the UCSB campus that I understood why she felt the way that she did.” Read more
  • April 2015 – UCSB Jewish Student (Arezu) “For the first time in my life, I felt that my identity, an unchangeable part of who I am, was under attack and my entire existence as a Jew was being questioned. No one in this room can look at this past year’s incidents and tell me that anti-Semitism doesn’t exist… I don’t wear that star of David necklace anymore. I don’t tell most people that I’m Jewish, and I definitely don’t tell them that I’m pro-Israel. I actively hide these things because I’m scared. Forget the fact that people treat me differently, forget the fact that I’m subjected to racial remarks and slurs. I’m scared for my safety.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Article Author paraphrasing student quotes “[Jewish student Arezu] stated that she had first encountered anti-Semitism during the spring of her freshman year, when she learned of the BDS movement. Since then, she has believed that anti-Semitism is detrimental to her life and well-being on the UCSB campus.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Article Author paraphrasing student quotes “UCSB Alpha Epsilon Pi chapter president and student sponsor of the resolution Daniel Lifton also spoke on behalf of the resolution, stating that he is“truly fearful” of the AEPi chapter house becoming a target for anti-Semitic acts.” Read more

 

University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC):

 

  • May 4, 2016 – UC Santa Cruz Jewish Student (Spencer) “You can’t be visibly pro-Israel on this campus without getting dirty looks…I wanted to get involved in those sort of [progressive] spaces here too. But as soon as I told people I had been on Birthright, it really turned them off. It was like, ‘How could you step on that soil?’ and it really drove a wedge between us.” Read more
  • May 4, 2016 – UC Santa Cruz Jewish Student (Adam) “There’s pressure here not to act Jewish…[For]  example…a member of [my]Jewish fraternity, one of the few students on campus to regularly wear a yarmulke, recently removed it from his head. ‘He didn’t feel comfortable walking around with it anymore.’” Read more
  • January 19, 2016 – Jewish UCSC Student (Stanley) “I condemn the divestment vote because it has already brought upon an Anti-Semitic climate to UC Santa Cruz. I have seen posts on social media after the vote was passed such as ‘Hitler did nothing wrong’ as well as various other Holocaust-associated ‘jokes’.” Read more
  • November 30, 2015 – Jewish UCSC Student (Daniel) “I wish that [my] being subjected to anti-Semitism was a shocking new occurrence. But the truth is that I’m not shocked. I’m not shocked because this hatred and ignorance has followed me everywhere. I’m not shocked because Jewish students have been targeted with this vile racism all over the [University of California] UC system for years, and especially since BDS became a major issue of discussion. Anti-Semitism … has … become an inseparable part of campus politics right here at UC Santa Cruz and across the UC system.” Read more
  • November 25, 2015 – UCSC Jewish Student (Daniel) “The implication that I, as a Jewish student and leader in the Jewish community, should not be allowed to vote on an issue that so deeply impacts the Jewish community, and that I should abstain because I cannot be trusted due to an alleged ‘Jewish agenda,’ echoes the racism Jews have faced all over the world throughout our history.” Read more
  • November 23, 2015 – UCSC Jewish Student and Vice President of Slugs for Israel (Stanley) “there was a strong Anti-Semitic sentiment behind the divestment vote….I condemn the divestment vote because it has already brought upon an Anti-Semitic climate to UC Santa Cruz. I have seen posts on social media after the vote was passed such as ‘Hitler did nothing wrong’ as well as various other Holocaust-associated ‘jokes.’… I personally feel embarrassed to be a Jewish student of a university with a student body that has stated it doesn’t support my homeland as well as that of the Jewish people.” Read more
  • November 20, 2015 – UCSC Jewish Student (Daniel) “The climate on campus has changed. Constituents from my own college have told me to abstain because of my Jewish agenda. So I am being personally discriminated against.” Read more
  • May 17, 2015 – UCSC Jewish Student (Amanda) – “It feels like we’re being punished for our heritage. It’s like, whatever is going on with these things in Israel is bad, and those who are connected and associated with it are bad. I see it as an animosity campaign.” Read more

 

University of Central Florida:

 

  • November 18, 2015 – University of Central Florida Student (Ashley) – (Following antisemitic Nazi-messaging stickers and posters on campus) “ …if they do know what they are doing, it’s definitely evil….The whole thing is upsetting…Think about what happened not even a hundred years ago” Read more

 

University of Chicago:

 

  • May 27, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Rachel) “The BDS campaign is more than just a campaign to divest from Israel; it’s to make sure that [pro-Israel] students feel unsafe and insecure.” May 27, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Rachel) – “The reason I chose the University of Chicago is I wanted to be challenged in every way imaginable, but I didn’t want my identity to be challenged. That’s really the biggest issue we see … no longer are we challenging people’s ideas and opinions, but we’re challenging the very fiber of who they are.” Read more
  • May 5, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Michael) “Over the past few weeks I have been told that Jews “don’t count” as a minority. I have been accused of using anti-semitism to justify oppression. All I want to know is why my campus doesn’t treat anti-semitism with the same rigor with which it treats any other forms of bias.” Read more
  • May 5, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Michael) “When Jews stood before the council, and asked that it recognize the Jewish right to self-determination, a basic right for all people, people in the room laughed. One representative noted that ‘If we were to affirm the right to Jewish self-determination … it takes away from the intent of the resolution.’” Read more
  • May 5, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Michael) “Students in the room that day called us racists and murderers and “apartheid supporters”, for even thinking we, as Jews, could have a voice in the discussion over the one small state we call our own. A Jewish student was chided “You are racist and you are against me and my family’s existence”. It was uncivil, and unproductive, but the council-members did not once that day condemn the personal nature of these attacks, or defend the rights of the opposition to make their case.” Read more
  • May 3, 2016 – University of Chicago Student Representative (Mike) “On the Friday before the vote, an individual who presented the BDS resolution to College Council told me that I should vote for her resolution because, in her words, any Jew who did not support BDS was “brainwashed.” As someone who does not identify with Jewish culture, this immediately signaled a central sentiment of hatred and hypocrisy behind the original proposal that could have been mitigated had we passed such amendments that would have disaffiliated us fromBDS but left us in pursuit of the positive goals that were also in this resolution.Unfortunately, most of College Council did not agree with this and ultimately cast anti-Semitic votes in favor of BDS. After our vote, the same individual who made that remark to me sent an email to College Council thanking us and claiming that we “had not caused the oppression of another group.” Seeing that this movement still believes that it can speak for how Jewish people should feel about our rejection of the notion of self-determination for Jews only proves the necessity of the amendments that Calvin and I proposed.” Read more
  • April 8, 2016 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Maxine) – [The divestment resolution] is also likely to lead to an increase in anti-Semitism on campus, including harassment and graffiti, as has already occurred on a range of campuses…” Read more
  • July 1, 2015 – University of Chicago Jewish Student (Eliora) “Who really pays the price of BDS? The answer is Diaspora Jewry. We pay for it every time a swastika is painted on a fraternity door after BDS passes in student governments, as happened at UC Davis and Stanford. We pay for it when our colleges become battlegrounds over Middle East policy and stages for mock checkpoints and “die-ins.””Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Shoshana) “ In reality this hatred is growing, and with no one trying to extinguish it, it will continue to grow.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Shoshana) “And, in some ways, this silence hurts most of all. It is the realization that nobody on campus actually cares about anti-Semitism.” Read more
  • Feb 2015 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Shoshana) “Last night I read through the past few days on UChicago Secrets and experienced post after post condemning Jews on campus, generalizing about their opinions and experiences, and minimizing the impact of the Holocaust. “People are hypocrites,” one read. “This is a fact. One example? The Jews at UChicago. Why? They all have grandparents who survived the Holocaust. This doesn’t stop them from denying the Holocaust in Palestine right now.” Another read, “I’m laughing hard at these people who are like ‘They Made Me Take Off My Star Of David, I Am So Oppressed.’ Try having soldiers come in and force you out of your home.” These are only two examples of many. Clearly motivated by anger about the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians, these posts expressed vitriol not toward only Zionists but also toward everybody of the Jewish faith, toward all Jews on this campus, toward me. I am not ashamed to say that this hatred moved me to tears.” Read more
  • Dec 2014 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Eliora) “This is how I recently went through a day at college: I woke up and checked the UChicago Secrets page on Facebook to find post #4145 with 39 likes: “I secretly think that President Zimmer doesn’t exist, and that if you were to open the door to his office, you would find a table full of elderly Jewish men making all the decisions and just passing themselves off as a single reclusive individual.” Later, I found my way to one of the bathrooms in the bookstore and noticed the graffiti on the stall: “Jewish men run the CIA”. I opened my reading for my Social Science requirement to hear Marx claim that malicious capitalists are “inwardly circumcised Jews” (Capital, Volume I). In other words, Marx associates the source and propagation of sinister economic forces with the Jew. After passing the pinwheels on the quad in honor of the horrific death of children in Gaza with no context as to what prompted and transpired during the most recent conflict there, I went to see Steven Salaita,..At the event, Salaita painted a picture that could be interpreted to suggest Jews control academia and silence views they don’t like, while repeating several times that he is not an anti-Semite.” Read more
  • Dec 2014 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Eliora) “Last year, I overheard someone in the library explaining why “Jews are annoying.” “All Jews run Wall Street. They take over all of the banks. It pisses me off,” the person said to the girl sitting next to him. “That shouldn’t make you dislike Jews,” she responded. Despite this, he went on. “That’s why I’m doing Economics. They can’t be the heads of everything.” Then, at a party, a student told a funny story about his friend who used to steal food from the dining hall. The punch line? “And he was a Jew!” My friend also woke up last year to a swastika taped to his door, while another found one etched on a desk.” Read more
  • Dec 2014 – Jewish University of Chicago Student (Eliora) “Beyond the threat of physical attacks, the subtlety of anti-Semitism on college campuses makes the phenomenon particularly unsettling. That post is still on UChicago Secrets; either the editors of the page didn’t have enough discretion, or no one found it problematic enough to encourage them to take it down.” Read more

 

University of Georgia:

 

  • March 16, 2016 – University of Georgia Jewish Student (Rachel) “Normally when we table, they’ll come over…block our table so people can’t talk to us, they’ll yell at us…So a demonstration like this, coming to our event, especially with such a strong showing, is scary.” Read more
  • March 16, 2016 – University of Georgia Jewish Student (Paula) “…several of the younger Jewish girls began to cry from the fear and tension in the room…Everyone I think was a little bit shaken” Read more

 

University of Houston:

 

  • April 28, 2016 – University of Houston Jewish Student (Tatiana) – “It is constantly one-sided. When Israeli soldiers came to speak on campus they were compared to Bin Laden. Something should be done.” Read more

 

University of Illinois at Chicago:

 

  • February 19, 2016 – University of Illinois at Chicago Student (Chloe) – “There were anti-Israel chants in the room along with Jewish students being harassed to the point they needed to be escorted by campus police to safety.” Read more
  • February 19, 2016 – University of Illinois at Chicago Student (Chloe) – “The BDS movement is so closely linked to anti-Semitism through it’s singling out of Israel.” Read more

 

University of Maryland:

 

  • April 26, 2016- University of Maryland Jewish Student (Leslie) – “SJP continuously uses the phrase ‘anti-Zionist,’ which tends to translate as ‘anti-Jewish.’” Read more
  • April 19, 2016 – University of Maryland Jewish Student (Sara) “Israel Fest is not a political event at all…This is a cultural event, and they have every right to protest but not to disrupt an event that we’ve put on.”

 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst:

 

  • June 2, 2016 – University of Massachusetts Jewish Student (Jeremy) – “It was kind of the first time I ever had to experience not being safe as a community.” Read more
  • February 24, 2016 – U Mass Amherst Jewish Student (Jeremy) – “After [my] article was published, students started reaching out to me, maybe 15 or so people, sharing their antisemitic experiences on campus, name-calling, slurs. Some no longer wear Jewish symbols because they are so uncomfortable being identifiable as Jewish. A student who’d gone on the Birthright trip [to Israel] the previous summer told me that almost every student who went, something like 80 students, had reported antisemitic experiences on campus.” Read more
  • February 2, 2016 – University of Massachusetts Amherst Jewish Student (Jeremy) – “ At UMass there is no room for ideas that strive to kill, and our [UMass] community is teaching us not to be proud, but afraid of our Jewish identity.” Read more
  • February 2, 2016 – University of Massachusetts Amherst Jewish Student (Jeremy) – “I have experienced anti-Semitism on campus before, though none of it has been violent. I have had change thrown at me, both on campus and off campus. People have made jokes about my nose, my major and more. I didn’t realize the number of other students who have had similar (and worse) experiences, even from just this past semester. Jewish students have been called kikes, an anti-Semitic slur, at the kosher dining section in Franklin Dining Commons, the only place on campus some Jews can eat, and in the very same snap story as these pictures, a video captioned “on my Jewish flow” showed a man picking up a coin.” Read more

 
 

University of Michigan:

 

  • December 21, 2015 – University of Michigan Jewish Student (Rina) “As a Jew, I am threatened. As a pro-Israel American, I am disgraced.” Read more
  • November 24, 2015 – University of Michigan Jewish Student (Talia) – “On the same day, I walked outside of my lecture hall and onto the Diag, the heart of Michigan’s campus, to see an “Apartheid Wall” and a mock checkpoint with an intimidating student dressed as a soldier, yelling at me as I walked by. Later, I attended class on Israel’s history taught by a professor who claims that Jews invented religious persecution, that the efforts and tactics of the terrorists of the Intifadas parallel those of the Maccabees, and that the recent terrorism in Israel is just a legitimate reaction to Israeli “oppression and occupation.” By the end of the day, I felt utterly powerless, afraid, and alone.” Read more
  • April 2014 Jewish U. of Michigan Student (Molly) – “Students who opposed the boycott efforts were targeted—subject to derogatory tweets, targeted with slanderous names, and abused for how they express their personal and even religious beliefs.” Read more
  • April 2014 Jewish U. of Michigan Student (Molly) – “I was not prepared to be told that, if I cared about human rights, I could not support Israel. I was not prepared to be told that my community was racist. I was not prepared to see my fellow students attacked with anti-Semitic slurs. And I was most definitely not prepared to be told that ‘anyone wearing the Israeli army uniform is a Ku Klux Klansman who does not deserve any place at any table in polite society because they are racist killers trying to break the back of Palestine, and they have succeeded.’” Read more
  • April 2014 Jewish U. of Michigan Student (Molly) – “It was not just individual students who were the victims of violent threats and intimidation by pro-Palestinian forces. Student Government representatives were similarly targeted and, most telling, called ‘kike’ and a ‘dirty Jew.’ Both CSG representatives and ordinary students were afraid to attend their classes because they felt unsafe.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Ben) “This environment is hardly conducive to listening and understanding. I am already defined –most of you have pinned me as someone either on your side or on the opposing side. Over the past week, I’ve seen an array of opinions – far left, far right, being inflated and condensed. This helps no one. I’m a proud Zionist, but I am also your peer.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Sara) “To BDS and SAFE… listen to yourself – you’re asking for equality, but your equality doesn’t incorporate the equality of my people. [T]o CSG – when you debate this resolution tonight, consider my words and my voice. I want change on this campus that includes all narratives – this resolution isn’t one of them.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Barak) “I’ve approached narratives and stories with tolerance, and I’ve been met with feelings that suggest I should be apologetic for being Pro-Israel. Expectation that we should apologize will not build peace.” Read more.
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Barak) “We do not seek to divide this campus but we seek to include everyone. BDS supporters express that CSG has silenced them, BDS has silenced me. CSG – think long and hard about this – remember the way they’ve behaved on campus to intimidate and divide the community. Realize the way they’ve undermined the integrity of the university and how it has affected all of us.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Adam) “This resolution goes against open dialogue, but is also an attempt to silence the Pro-Israeli movement on campus.” Read more
  • March 2014 – Jewish University of Michigan Student (Alex) “As stated in preamble “Foster fellowship and collaboration among students” BDS does the opposite. A vote for BDS directly contradicts this – doesn’t value collaboration of students on campus. A one sided tactic. I will no longer feel comfortable sharing my story on campus, I will feel that the student government I elected will no longer want to hear my voice. I ask you so that both narratives can be shared and heard.” Read more

 

University of Missouri:

 

  • December 9, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Michael) “It’s started to feel like Jewish lives don’t matter.” Read more
  • December 9, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Michael) “[S]everal incidents [I] experienced while involved in activist work bordered on anti-Semitism…. In one exchange while working an information table for [my] Jewish fraternity, an Arab student accosted [me] by calling Jews “Nazis” and “kikes.” In another, [I] witnessed a prominent rabbi from St. Louis listed as a “true terrorist” at a Black Lives Matter meeting — the rabbi’s crime was sending money to Israel. It’s hard to be a Jewish student and support these groups when harsh criticism of Israel sometimes turns into criticism of the Jews…While participating in a recent social justice committee meeting, I] heard a group of African-American students defending the recent spate of Palestinian stabbings targeting Jews in Israel.” Read more
  • November 15, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Nicole) “Leaders of Loyola’s chapter of Students for Justice in Palestine began posting messages that certain students were not welcome as allies of the protesting black students. “Zionists on campus [are] pretending to be outraged,” one post claimed. The post went further claiming that “Zionist” students had “fake ass sympathy and crocodile tears” for the Mizzou students, and ended with the declaration, “Your solidarity ain’t shit.” Another student likened the racist slurs against black students to the words of the “Zionists” who had opposed last year’s divestment movement…. The use of the word “Zionists” in these post served a simple goal — lumping a diverse group of mainly Jewish students into a single neat category. Our identity is stripped of its ethnic complexity, its religious sanctity and anything that might indicate our humanity.” Read more
  • November 15, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Nicole) “The message was clear, if you were a student who had opposed divestment from Israel, you were not welcome at the rally. This was made all the clearer as I stood on the stone steps in front of Loyola’s library and listened to the interwoven chants, “BLACK LIVES MATTER, FREE FREE PALESTINE.” The black students leading the chants wore keffiyahs.” Read more
  • November 11, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Thalia) “Jewish students on this campus are really concerned with the rising anti-Semitism on this campus but we’re not being silent about it.” Read more
  • October 30, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Thalia) “I still think that when something like this [swastikas] happens, Jewish students feel threatened…I was actually really mad about this because I heard about it from a Maneater reporter. It happened on the 24th, and we’re only talking about it now? Why wasn’t JSO contacted earlier by Residential Life?” Read more
  • October 18, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Hannah) “The posters said, “Boycott, divest and sanction Israel.” BDS is so often the tank that carries anti-Semitism to our campuses. More than that, the BDS movement has brought hate, ignorance and even physical violence to other campuses…The thought of seeing my Mizzou ridden with hate like that made me feel physically ill. It all starts with one vandalized poster. It all could start here. I have just found my place here; I don’t want violence to explode from it. We can’t let the tank that is BDS into our school. It’s a thin veil covering violence and hate.” Read more
  • October 18, 2015 – University of Missouri Jewish Student (Hannah) “Seeing big green letters protesting my identity is like watching someone confiscate my name. It rips at a part of me that is so ingrained my life, both mundane and spiritual that I can’t ignore it.” Read more
  • June 11, 2015 – University of Missouri Pro-Israel student (Destiny)– “Professor Smith has used his tenure to bring in anti-Israel speakers with university funding. Recently, six university departments sponsored a talk by author Saree Makdisi, who has said it is more important to eliminate the Jewish state than to create a Palestinian one. He uses his reputation to get several departmental sponsors. But when Students Supporting Israel or CUFI asks these same departments to co-sponsor events, we wither don’t hear back or we hear, ‘we cannot help you.’ It’s not fair.” Read More
  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Missouri Student & President of SSI (Jared), Following a Swastika and the Word “Heil” found at a Resident Hall- “I do think that it [the University’s response] was not punctual, and that it should have been released earlier and more quickly to when the incident actually happened, because that left us with five days wondering if the administration even cared” Read More
  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Missouri Student (Thalia), Following a Swastika and the Word “Heil” found at a Resident Hall- “It becomes harder to show my Jewish identity. I’m so proud to be a Jewish student on this campus. I’m so proud to flaunt my Jewish identity but when incidents like this happen, it’s scary. This person doesn’t know me but they hate me just because of the single aspect that I’m Jewish.” Read More
  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Missouri Student (Chantelle), Following a Swastika and the Word “Heil” found at a Resident Hall- “It [seeing swastika grafitti] doesn’t make people feel safe to go to school here, and that isn’t something that we should have to worry about. You shouldn’t have to watch your back when you’re walking to class and you shouldn’t have to think about whether you’re going to be safe while you’re at school.” Read More

 

University of Minnesota:

 

  • April 13, 2016 – University of Minnesota Jewish Student (Sami) – “The companies [in the divestment resolution] were chosen specifically to target Israel and thereby the Jewish community on campus.” Read more
  • February 16, 2016 – University of Minnesota Jewish Student (Sami) – ““I hope that students will really dig deeper to see what this [divestment] campaign is really about in its effort to not only delegitimize the state of Israel, but it creates a hostile climate towards Jewish students and other students who are supportive of Israel.” Read more

 

University of New Mexico:

 

  • April 2015 – Jewish University of New Mexico Student (Alex) “If this [divestment] vote were to pass, I would no longer feel safe. I would no longer feel comfortable as a Jewish student” Read more
  • May 2014 – Jewish University of New Mexico Student (Rose) “The way this resolution reads this sends a clear message to me that I am not welcome at the University of New Mexico, a place I have called home for four years.” Read more

 

University of North Carolina Charlotte:

 

  • September 2014 – Jewish University of North Carolina Charlotte Student (Neili) “I feel like I am being attacked because I wear my Star of David out in public, I wear shirts with the word Israel on it or shirts with Hebrew lettering, I have Israel stickers on my laptop…[I have been] spit at…I have been called a terrorist, baby killer, woman killer, [told that] I use blood to make matzah and other foods, Christ killer, occupier, and much more…[a female student] looked at me with a straight face and said to ‘go burn in an oven’” Read more

 

University of South Florida:

 

  • February 2016 – University of South Florida Jewish Student (Hannah) “Yes, my eyes were opened to the terrifying reality that anti-Semitism still exists. And it exists on my campus.” Read more
  • February 2016 – University of South Florida Jewish Student (Hannah) “I would have never thought that I would feel as exhausted, betrayed, and silenced as I did during last night’s USF Student Senate meeting. My eyes were opened to the terrifying reality that anti-Semitism still exists, when the Senate passed a bill calling on the University to divest from Israel. It was claimed by the sponsors of the resolution that it is not anti-Semitic. How can this be the case when the only country mentioned in the resolution as the sole violator of human rights in the world is Israel?” Read more
  • February 2016 – University of South Florida Jewish Student (Lauren) “Our voices were not heard at the Student Government meetings. Not only were our voices not heard, they were silenced. We were not allowed to speak; to defend Israel. Instead, we were failed by the very institution that was put in place to protect the students and our rights.” Read more
  • January 22, 2016 – Student Government Senator (Ralph) (Spoken at a meeting discussing a BDS resolution) “If we want pretend that this is anything other than racism and anti-Semitism, then you absolutely delusional. This bill does not take as back to the 1950s era where racism was common among racial minorities. This takes us straight back to 1930s Nazi Germany. This is absolutely ridiculous. It is ridiculous that this body is even considering this and I am ashamed to be a USF Bull at this moment.” Read more

 

University of Southern California:

 

  • March 30, 2016 – USC Student Senator (Daniel) “I am beyond disheartened to hear of these multiple instances of antisemitism on campus. There is no place for any kind of hatred on our campus. We must recognize these deplorable acts and broaden the scope of our efforts to improve campus climate by ensuring that all forms of discrimination do not go unpunished.” Read more
  • March 8, 2016 – USC Jewish Student (Jacob) “I have been the target of vicious anti-Semitism .” Read more
  • March 2015 – USC Jewish Student (Ariel) “The comments I overheard [by the Women’s Student Assembly Director who said ‘I feel that I was elected because my constituents believe in my political stance, and I honestly don’t want to use our funds for a Jew to speak.’] didn’t just upset me with their insensitivity. They made me feel like I was just another Jew our university will not invite to speak up. It’s moments like these, in which leaders of my community fervently believe and advocate that Jewish voices should not be heard, that remind me why my Zionism matters.” Read more
  • August 31, 2015, USC Jewish Student A Jewish student felt that an op-ed piece written by another student was antisemitic in undertones. The student wrote, “In an article posted on Aug 19, 2015 by the Daily Trojan, opinion writer Lida Dianti offers a personal, defamatory and thinly veiled anti-semitic attack directed at me. I am viciously slandered as racist, elitist, entitled, and privileged. Ms. Dianti freely hurls out the age old anti-Semitic canard, of the Jew controlling money. Ms. Dianti, spins my concern for how tuition dollars are spent as a primitive fixation on money. This language contributes to the article’s use of anti-Semitic tropes that portrays the Jew as a scheming usurer.”

 

University of Texas, Austin:

 

  • November 20, 2015 – UT Austin Jewish Student (Omer) “It’s hostile to be a Jew in this world, and I don’t think people are sympathizing with the Jewish community here…It’s not just anti-Israel sentiment, but a lot of anti-Semitism as well.” Read more
  • November 20, 2015 – UT Austin Jewish Student (Michael) “{I]received multiple online threats for [my] involvement with Texans for Israel and…was shouted down by anti-Israel activists while reading the names of Holocaust victims aloud on Remembrance Day. [I] believe that anti-Israel activism often overlaps with outright anti-Semitism…Zionism is the idea of creating a Jewish state. So when PSC uses the term ‘Zionist’ inflammatorily, they are insinuating that it is a bad thing to believe there should be a Jewish state.” Read more
  • November 20, 2015 – UT Austin Jewish Student (Jordan) “Within the past year, a PSC member has described Israeli Jews as a “non-essential group” of “Europeanized (and yet ancient) others,” despite the fact that most of them are the descendents of refugees expelled from Middle Eastern and African countries. Another PSC member has promoted another Intifada, which would result in violence against Israeli civilians. They have targeted Texas Hillel, a Jewish religious center, as a “partisan of privilege,” mirroring the prominent trope that Jews are a wealthy, powerful collective. And, most troublingly, they have repeated the twisted canard that Jewish refugees conspired with the Nazi regime that many of them, like my grandfather, fled during World War II. These overtones create an atmosphere of fear and intimidation that has befallen Jewish students on campuses around the world.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Texas, Austin Student (Maya) “This hateful rhetoric that is directed at my people and at me personally is one-sided” Read more
  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Texas, Austin Student (Tracy) “UTDivest has taken a conflict in the Middle East as an opportunity to bash the Jewish community — and my community — at Texas Hillel.” Read more

 

University of Toledo:

 

  • April 2015 – Jewish University of Toledo Student (Jacob)(Author note, “Jacob Richart, a freshman at UT, said during the March 3 meeting he felt that SG decision [overturning ruling that BDS resolution was unconstitutional] was a result of manipulation”) “What these past two weeks have taught me is that bullying is an accepted form of currency at UT. What these past two weeks have taught me is to expect intimidation and manipulation of my peers at UT.” Read more

 

University of Pittsburgh:

 

  • Nov 24, 2014 – Jewish University of Pittsburgh Student & Organizer of an Pro-Israel Event Disrupted by Masked Protesters with Noisemakers (Haley) “It was really jarring. It was sudden. This large group of masked people came in with noisemakers and a large white sheet [used as a protest sign]. It was kind of scary; it was very out of nowhere.” Read more

 

University of Washington:

 

  • Nov 24, 2014 – Jewish University of Washington Student (Nathan) “I’ve attended the UW for four years now, I’ll be graduating at the end of this quarter, and during my time here I’ve faced more anti-Semitism than I’d like to admit. I’ve had TAs whose grading of my work drastically changed for the worse mid-quarter after I spoke out about the need for a Jewish State. I’ve gotten dirty looks around campus for displaying my Star of David prominently around my neck. I’ve had classmates quite literally cease interaction with me after discovering my Jewish heritage, no longer sitting near me during lectures and going out of their way to be in different groups during quiz sections.” Read more
  • Nov 24, 2014 – Jewish University of Washington Student (Nathan) “…oftentimes, when people on campus see my Star of David or find out that I’m Jewish, I’ve become the target for their frustration and anger with the State of Israel’s actions. Many will never admit it, but simply by being Jewish, I’ve become their enemy…some people see my Star of David and brand me as someone toxic, someone worthy of their disdain and vitriol.” Read more

 

University of Wisconsin-Madison:

 

  • April 21, 2016 Jewish UW Madison Student (Hilary) – “…based on what [I] witnessed in California [at UC Berkeley and UC Irvine], [I’m] afraid the situation on campus could deteriorate if BDS becomes a stronger force at UW–Madison. “ Read more
  • February 25, 2016 – University of Wisconsin-Madison Jewish Student (Jonathan) – “There is anti-Semitism lurking under our society.” Read more
  • February 23, 2016 – University of Wisconsin Madison Student (Charlie) – “Ultimately, the administration failed the Jewish community on this campus.” Read more

 

Ursinus University:

 

  • November 5, 2015 – Jewish Ursinus College Student (Rachel)“I think the worst one was someone coming right up to my face saying it’s a shame I’m going to hell because I’m Jewish” Read more
  • November 5, 2015 – Jewish Ursinus College Student (Rachel) “I’ve had people asking me where my horns are. I’m thinking, ‘Did I just hear that?’”Read more
  • November 5, 2015 – Non-Jewish Ursinus College Student (Jane) “I don’t think I realized how much of an effect anti-Semitism has on campus.” Read more

 

Vassar College:

 

  • March 30, 2016 – Vassar Jewish Student (Jesse) – “BDS supporters took every opportunity to imply that opposing their brand of activism is racist; while every time antisemitism was mentioned it was met with laughter and mockery. Multiple at-large members were in tears while reading statements on how the debate has affected them, and were met with BDS supporters pointing and laughing. While it was not loud enough to interrupt their statements, it was noticed and commented on by members of the audience…. I do think that there is a great deal of antisemitism embedded in the BDS movement and in Students for Justice in Palestine…” Read more
  • March 15, 2016 – Vassar College Jewish Student (Jason) – “In my three years at Vassar College…I have watched Jewish friends bullied into silence by aggressive anti-Israel activists who call the Jews racists. I have seen many anti-Semitic comments from fellow students on social media. Although I have had many good experiences at Vassar and have made many friends, it can be uncomfortable to be Jewish here, especially if one supports Israel.” Read more
  • March 15, 2016 – Vassar College Jewish Student (Jason) – “They did not stay away because they were busy or because Vassar lacks anti-BDS students. They stayed away because they were afraid of pro-BDS students who have, over the past two years, pursued an aggressive campaign of intimidation at Vassar.” Read more
  • March 15, 2016 – Vassar College Jewish Student (Jason) – One Jewish student talked about how the BDS campaign had invoked every anxiety nightmare she had ever had. She was crying as she spoke. Pro-BDS students laughed at her.” Read more
  • March 2, 2016 – Vassar College Jewish Student (Jesser) – “The reason that Jewish parents are afraid to send their students to Vassar isn’t because they’re conservative, it’s because they’ve seen what effect movements like this [BDS] have at similar college cam­puses throughout the country, and they’re afraid that something like that can happen at Vassar. Frankly, so am I.” Read more
  • February 26, 2016 – Vassar College Jewish Student (Sophie) – “…many times at Vassar anti-Israel sentiment has crossed that line, and it has become harder to differentiate nuanced criticisms of Israel and anti-Semitism much less the arguments for an end to Israel as a Jewish state in any form.As a student I am disappointed by the unwillingness to have a two-sided dialogue on BDS or the anti-Semitism permeating much of this issue.” Read more
  • February 17, 2016 – Vassar Jewish Student (Sara) – “Be­cause we are the only pro-Israel organization on campus, we are demonized.” Read more
  • February 11, 2016 -Vassar College Jewish Student (Jesse) – “The activities and language of pro-Palestinian groups on campus goes above and beyond cri­tiquing Israel into demonizing opposition.” Read more
  • February 11, 2016 -Vassar College Jewish Student (Jesse) – “When organizations such as SJP make broad statements condemning all Zionists as racists, not only are they attempting to mar­ginalize and demonize their opposition, but they are sending a message to the community that it is okay to think less of a Jew who defends Israel’s right to exist.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Jewish Vassar College Student, as Quoted in the Comments Section (NK) – “This year, SJP has made Vassar an unsafe environment for me and for other Jewish students. From their harassment of students participating in the spring break trip, to the Nazi incident and anti-Zionist rhetoric about ethnic cleansing that verges on blood libel, SJP has done everything in its power to make Vassar an unsafe space for Jews.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish Vassar College Student (Sarah) “My Israel identity is important to me. It is super intimidating to walk into the College Center and feel that that my core identity is being questioned. It’s really difficult to come to terms with hearing that a place you call your homeland shouldn’t exist.” Read more
  • September 2014 – Jewish Vassar College Student (Samantha) “A few weeks ago, I was invited to a pro-Palestinian rally…[O]ut of concern that the event would have placed all of the blame on Israel while excusing Hamas and glossing over the moral complexities, I resisted my temptation to attend. [N]ow I am returning to my college campus, an environment where the Israel-Palestine discussion is hugely polarized and devoid of nuance. Many students label themselves “pro-Israel” or “pro-Palestine” and close their eyes to the other’s humanity and right to self-determination. ” Read more

 

Washington University St. Louis:

  • April 2015 – Washington University Jewish Student (Kaity) “Kazani’s poems did not simply seek to voice a new perspective. They made light of the Holocaust and sought to delegitimize Israel’s basic right to exist.” Read more
  • April 2015 – Washington University Jewish Student (Kaity) “The event made Jewish students feel unsafe, unwelcome and unheard on this campus. The conversation that night sparked an anxiety among the Jewish community here that had me up into the early hours of the morning, trying to offer reassurance and support to my friends and classmates.” Read more

Wellesley College:

  • Nov 2014 – Wellesley College Jewish Student (Jordan) “I firmly believe this college is becoming increasingly anti-Semitic” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Wellesley College Jewish Student (Rebecca) “[Sa’ed Atshan, a postdoctoral fellow at Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies and a lecturer in peace and justice studies at Tufts University, who spoke at a meeting sponsored by Wellesley SJP that Rebecca attended] said that the Jewish state was established in its present location “only because Uganda wasn’t available…[and] he equated all non-Zionist Jews with Jews of conscience, which makes Zionist Jews something else, I guess. It was extremely destructive, and with the posters and the lack of face-to-face dialogue, added to the stalemate on campus” Read more
  • Nov 2014 – Wellesley College Jewish Student (Rachel) “Things that are central to our identity are being attacked, including the existence of Israel as a Jewish state” Read more

 

Wesleyan University:

  • April 25, 2016 – Wesleyan University Jewish Student (Grace) – “…because I cannot separate my Judaism from my Zionism, the apartheid wall display struck me as a hate-filled personal attack. Wesleyan is supposed to be a place of inclusion, but the display felt like it was meant to ostracize certain community members.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Wesleyan University Jewish Student (Rebecca) “At sundown on Sunday, April 27th, Yom HaShoah began. Internationally, Jews and people of all religions commemorated those lost in the Holocaust. At Wesleyan University, at 7 pm on the same day, the student government opened a discussion of Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS). The Wesleyan Student Assembly (WSA) certainly did not intend for these two events to coincide, and demonstrated this by attempting to postpone the discussion after being made aware of the meaning of the day. However, supporters of the BDS resolution were discontent to allow students to commemorate those lost in the Holocaust, and ferociously argued for the discussion to remain on that day. With barely ten minutes notice, students were forced to decide between attending vigils for Holocaust Remembrance Day, and engaging in a difficult political discussion. Many students either did not receive the message in time, or chose to honor Yom HaShoah instead of attending the WSA meeting. The conversation that day was almost entirely dominated by supporters of the resolution, and acknowledging this unfair disparity, members of the student assembly chose to postpone the vote on BDS to one week later.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Wesleyan University Jewish Student (Rebecca) “Throughout the assembly meeting, the room was full of incredible hostility, despite the efforts of WSA members to keep it civil. As the vocal minority in the meeting, we were shushed and openly mocked.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Wesleyan University Jewish Student (Rebecca) “Due to previous instances of harassment and the antagonistic actions of many in the meeting, I and other opponents of the resolution felt unsafe and uncomfortable leaving the room until the crowd had dissipated. Members of the WSA offered to escort us out of the building and even to call a Public Safety officer to ease our discomfort and ensure our safety. Although we did not feel the need to take them up on this offer, they clearly recognized the intimidation that pervaded the meeting.” Read more
  • May 2014 – Wesleyan University Jewish Student (Rebecca) “No student on this or any campus should be made to feel unsafe for his or her beliefs. This resolution, while not doing anything to improve human rights on the ground and simply serving as a condemnation of Israel, has also caused an incredibly hostile campus atmosphere that will not be easily eradicated.” Read more